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I am developing an application in C# by using the ADO.NET Entity Framework.

In many examples on the web I see that in order to add an element, newProduct, to an entity, let's assume Product, it is used the following code:

context.Products.Add(newProduct);

The method Add, however, it is not a member of Products so I cannot use it. Maybe the EF used in the examples is LinqToSQL.

However in ADO.NET there is a method AddObject:

context.AddObject("Products", newProduct)

and it works but I don't like it for two reasons:

1) I try to avoid as much as possible magic strings unless they are really the only resort to implement a functionality

2) It gives void as a return type, how can I check whether the insert was good or not?

I believe there is another way to insert my entities. Anybody might help?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1) I try to avoid as much as possible magic strings unless they are really the only resort to implement a functionality

If context is an ObjectContext (EF <= 4.0), you should normally have a member in your derived context which represents the ObjectSet<Product> with the name Products or similar. You can use then:

context.Products.AddObject(newProduct);

Even if you don't have such a set in your context there is another strongly-typed option:

context.CreateObjectSet<Product>().AddObject(newProduct);

2) It gives void as a return type, how can I check whether the insert was good or not?

AddObject does not perfrom the INSERT into the database at all. It only puts the object into Added state in the objectContext. The real INSERT happens later in a single transaction when you call SaveChanges.

Nonetheless, AddObject can fail, maybe if you add two objects with the same key into the context (if your entity does not have autogenerated identities for the key), or for other reasons. If so, AddObject will throw an exception which you shouldn't catch because it usually indicates a serious problem or bug in your code.

SaveChanges returns an int. But this int does not indicate that SaveChanges and inserting your object was successful. It only counts the number objects which are in Added state (will cause INSERT statement), in Modified state (will cause UPDATE statement) and in Deleted state (will cause DELETE statement) in the object context before the SQL statements get exceuted.

Again, if any of the SQL statements (like your INSERT) was not successful, SaveChanges will throw an exception. The exception can indicate problems already on client side or it can tell you that a problem during a SQL operation occured - for example: For a failed INSERT the exception might give you a message that the INSERT failed because there was already a row with the key you want to insert in the database or that required non-nullable columns are not filled in the entity you want to insert, etc. Also exceptions due to concurrency issues are possible among a lot of other exception types.

You can check if SaveChanges succeeded by catching possible exceptions:

try
{
    int numberOfObjects = context.SaveChanges();
}
catch (SomeExceptionType e)
{
    // What now?
}

BTW: The context.Products.Add(...) you've seen was most likely an example where context is a DbContext (EF >= 4.1). DbContext is a simplified API to Entity Framework (which still uses the core ObjectContext under the covers). In this API the method to insert a new entity is indeed called Add (method of DbSet<T>) and not AddObject.

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well what can I say...it is a hell of an answer. Many thanks for your time –  CiccioMiami Apr 7 '12 at 3:47

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