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How should I use callback functions in parsekit? suppose I have the following rule:

expr_s = expr_p '+' expr_s | expr_p ; 

should I pop 3 symbols from the resulting PKAssembly and add first and last numbers and then push the answer back to the stack?
And for the above rule how should I know it is the first or the second rule that caused a match?
I don't understand the order in which ParseKit calls callback functions. I could really use some help.

Thanks Todd for your response, keeping in mind your instructions I wrote the following grammar and callback functions for a simple mathematics expression that includes addition and multiplication:

- (IBAction)press_equals:(id)sender {
NSString *g = @"@start = expr_s; expr_s = expr_p ('+'! expr_p)+ ; expr_p = Number ('*'!     Number)+  ;";
PKParser *p = [[PKParserFactory factory] parserFromGrammar:g assembler:self];
NSString *s = @"3*4+4*8";

[p parse:s];

PKAssembly *res = [p parse:s];
NSLog(@"res %@", res);

}



- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchExpr_s:(PKAssembly *)a {
NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

NSArray *toks = [a objectsAbove:nil];


double total = 0.0;
for (PKToken *tok in toks) {
    total += tok.floatValue;
}


a.target = [NSNumber numberWithDouble:total];
}
- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchExpr_p:(PKAssembly *)a {
NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

NSArray *toks = [a objectsAbove:nil];


double total = 1.0;
for (PKToken *tok in toks) {
    total *= tok.floatValue;
}
a.target = [NSNumber numberWithDouble:total];
}

and here is the output I get:

2012-04-06 22:54:31.975 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController    parser:didMatchExpr_p:] [3, 4]3/*/4^+/4/*/8
2012-04-06 22:54:31.976 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController parser:didMatchExpr_p:] [4, 8]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
2012-04-06 22:54:31.977 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController parser:didMatchExpr_s:] []3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
2012-04-06 22:54:31.977 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController parser:didMatchExpr_p:] [3, 4]3/*/4^+/4/*/8
2012-04-06 22:54:31.978 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController parser:didMatchExpr_p:] [4, 8]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
2012-04-06 22:54:31.978 Calculator[1070:207] -[CalculatorViewController parser:didMatchExpr_s:] []3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
2012-04-06 22:54:31.979 Calculator[1070:207] res 0

Why is my res 0?

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2  
Sadegh, I have updated my answer below to match your revised question. In the future, please consider starting a new question if the details of what you are asking change significantly. –  Todd Ditchendorf Apr 6 '12 at 23:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Developer of ParseKit here.

First, the best way to understand this stuff is Steven Metsker's book, upon which ParseKit is based.


Second, checkout my answer to another question about PKAssembly's stack and target.


Third, here's my answer to another PaseKit question about unexpected callbacks.


Fourth, checkout the TDArithmeticParser.m file in the the ParseKit Tests Target (included in the ParseKit Xcode project. This class has callbacks which implement the same kind of arithmetic logic you seem to be looking for.

Also checkout the arithmetic.grammar file (also in the ParseKit Tests Target). This is an example of how to design an arithmetic grammar in ParseKit syntax.


Finally, here's some thoughts more specific to your example above.

Let's clarify your grammar a bit, as the question you're asking is pretty basic, and I don't think it requires a very complex grammar to tackle. Here's a basic arithmetic grammar which gives multiplication and division operators precedence over addition and subtraction:

@start         = expr;
expr           = term (plusTerm | minusTerm)*;
term           = factor (timesFactor | divFactor)*;
plusTerm       = '+'! term;
minusTerm      = '-'! term;
timesFactor    = '*'! factor;
divFactor      = '/'! factor;
factor         = Number;

That ! after the '+' tells ParseKit to discard this token automatically. This makes things slightly more convenient for you when writing your callbacks.

Note that if you want your grammar to have only left-to-right operator precedence (like a calculator), this grammar will not work. If you need that, please ask a separate question tagged #ParseKit here on StackOverflow, and I will answer it promptly.

I would define these callbacks:

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchExpr:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    NSNumber *n = [a pop];

    // the expr is complete, and its value is on the stack.
    // important! wrap things up by 
    // storing your work in `a.target`. not in an ivar.
    a.target = n;
}

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchFactor:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    // a number token was found. store its number value on the stack
    PKToken *tok = [a pop];
    [a push:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:tok.floatValue]];
}

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchPlusTerm:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    // a '+' expr was found. pop off the two operands and add them
    // store the result on the stack temporarily
    NSNumber *n2 = [a pop];
    NSNumber *n1 = [a pop];
    [a push:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:[n1 doubleValue] + [n2 doubleValue]]];
}

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchMinusTerm:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    // a '-' expr was found. pop off the two operands and subtract them
    // store the result on the stack temporarily
    NSNumber *n2 = [a pop];
    NSNumber *n1 = [a pop];
    [a push:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:[n1 doubleValue] - [n2 doubleValue]]];
}

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchTimesFactor:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    // a '*' expr was found. pop off the two operands and multiply them
    // store the result on the stack temporarily
    NSNumber *n2 = [a pop];
    NSNumber *n1 = [a pop];
    [a push:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:[n1 doubleValue] * [n2 doubleValue]]];
}

- (void)parser:(PKParser *)p didMatchDivideFactor:(PKAssembly *)a {
    NSLog(@"%s %@", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, a);

    // a '/' expr was found. pop off the two operands and divide them
    // store the result on the stack temporarily
    NSNumber *n2 = [a pop];
    NSNumber *n1 = [a pop];
    [a push:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:[n1 doubleValue] / [n2 doubleValue]]];
}

Two important points are

  1. Don't worry about how many times these callbacks are called. They may be called more times than you expect, or in strange-seeming order.
  2. Don't store the results of work done in these callbacks in an ivar. Always store your work on either the a argument's target or stack. I usually store temporary values on the stack, and the ultimate result on the target, as I find that most convenient. But you have flexibility there.

I would write this driver code:

NSString *g = .. // fetch grammar above
PKParser *p = [[PKParserFactory factory] parserFromGrammar:g assembler:self];
NSString *s = @"3*4+4*8";

PKAssembly *res = [p parse:s];
NSLog(@"res %@", res);

I see this log output:

-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchFactor:] [3]3^*/4/+/4/*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchFactor:] [3, 4]3/*/4^+/4/*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchTimesFactor:] [3, 4]3/*/4^+/4/*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchFactor:] [12, 4]3/*/4/+/4^*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchFactor:] [12, 4, 8]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchTimesFactor:] [12, 4, 8]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchPlusTerm:] [12, 4]3/*/4/+/4^*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchPlusTerm:] [12, 32]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchExpr:] [3]3^*/4/+/4/*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchExpr:] [12]3/*/4^+/4/*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchExpr:] [16]3/*/4/+/4^*/8
-[DebugAppDelegate parser:didMatchExpr:] [44]3/*/4/+/4/*/8^
res 44

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you todd. –  sadegh Apr 7 '12 at 12:30
1  
Sure thing Sadegh. Since this seemed to work for you, can you please "check" my answer as correct so I will receive credit? Thanks. –  Todd Ditchendorf Apr 7 '12 at 15:05

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