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Is this good practice? Storing objects accessed by a constant. There are plenty of ways to store objects to be accessed by other classes for processing. Using constants instead as means to store hash objects that point to collections is something I recently started doing besides * @@class_variables. What would be the pro's / con's to this if there are any? Not really new to OOP but any insight what would be bad practice would be appreciated.

  #!/usr/bin/env ruby 
  OUTSIDE_STATE = true

  NAMES = {:objects => []}

  module CheckSelf
    module ClassMethods
      def self.inherited(child)
        ::NAMES[:objects] << child
      end

      def select_and_make_calls
        _selected = NAMES[:objects].select {|child|
            child.purpose() 
          }.each {|child|
          # _child = child.new(child)
          child.new(child).call_out
        }
      end    
    end

    module InstanceMethods
      def call_out
        puts "FIRING OFF THE CALLS #{self.class}"
      end
    end

    def self.included(receiver)
      receiver.extend         ClassMethods
      receiver.send :include, InstanceMethods
    end
  end

  class Parent

    def initialize(name)
      @name = name
    end  

    include CheckSelf

    # The inherited class must be defined in the * 
    # Body of the class.
    def self.inherited(child)
      NAMES[:objects] << child
    end

  end

  class ObjectOne < Parent

  def self.purpose
      OUTSIDE_STATE
    end
  end

  class ObjectTwo < Parent
    def self.purpose
      true
    end

  end

  Parent.select_and_make_calls
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You may want to look at how Ruby already does some of this, using #object_id and the ObjectSpace class: corelib.rubyonrails.org/classes/ObjectSpace.html#M001614 –  joelparkerhenderson Apr 6 '12 at 15:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I recommend against using constants to store changing data. Using constants not only tells the interpreter that your data won't change, it also tells other programmers that read your code. If you need somewhere to store data over time, use a @@class_variable, and @instance_variable or a $global instead.

This is not so much an OOP convention as a ruby convention.

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Further to this point, when using constants of a type that could be changed (e.g. non-primitive types such as NAMES above) but aren't expected to it can be useful both to the interpreter and to other programmers to freeze them once they've been defined, e.g. FOO = [ :bar, :baz ].freeze. –  Jordan Apr 6 '12 at 16:21

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