Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have two tables structured like so:

CREATE TABLE #nodes(node int NOT NULL);
ALTER TABLE #nodes ADD CONSTRAINT PK_nodes PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (node);

CREATE TABLE #arcs(child_node int NOT NULL, parent_node int NOT NULL);
ALTER TABLE #arcs ADD CONSTRAINT PK_arcs PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (child_node, parent_node);

INSERT INTO #nodes(node)
VALUES (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7);

INSERT INTO #arcs(child_node, parent_node)
VALUES (2, 3), (3, 4), (2, 6), (6, 7);

If I have two nodes, lets say 1 and 2. I want a list of their root nodes. In this case it would be 1, 4, and 7. How can I write a query to get me that information ?

I took a stab at writing it but ran into the issue that I can't use a LEFT join in the recursive part of a CTE for some unknown reason. Here is the query that would work if I was allowed to do a LEFT JOIN.

WITH root_nodes
AS (
    -- Grab all the leaf nodes I care about and their parent
    SELECT n.node as child_node, a.parent_node
    FROM #nodes n
    LEFT JOIN #arcs a
      ON n.node = a.child_node
    WHERE n.node IN (1, 2)

    UNION ALL

    -- Grab all the parent nodes
    SELECT rn.parent_node as child_node, a.parent_node
    FROM root_nodes rn
    LEFT JOIN #arcs a -- <-- LEFT JOINS are Illegal for some reason :(
      ON rn.parent_node = a.child_node
    WHERE rn.parent_node IS NOT NULL
)
SELECT DISTINCT rn.child_node as root_node
FROM root_nodes rn
WHERE rn.parent_node IS NULL

Is there a way I can restructure the query to get what I want ? I can't restructure the data and I would really prefer to stay away from temporary tables or having to do anything expensive.

Thanks, Raul

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about moving the LEFT JOIN out of the CTE?

WITH root_nodes
AS (
    -- Grab all the leaf nodes I care about
    SELECT NULL as child_node, n.node as parent_node
    FROM #nodes n
    WHERE n.node IN (1, 2)

    UNION ALL

    -- Grab all the parent nodes
    SELECT rn.parent_node as child_node, a.parent_node
    FROM root_nodes rn
        JOIN #arcs a
      ON rn.parent_node = a.child_node
)
SELECT DISTINCT rn.parent_node AS root_node
FROM root_nodes rn
    LEFT JOIN #arcs a
  ON rn.parent_node = a.child_node
WHERE a.parent_node IS NULL

The result set is 1, 4, 7.

share|improve this answer
    
That's brilliant! Don't know why I didn't think of that. I do have on question, when I look at the execution plan it's making the left join a clustered index scan. Why would it not choose a seek like the recursive part is doing ? –  HaxElit Apr 6 '12 at 16:07
    
I don't know why. I tried adding WITH (INDEX (PK_arcs)), but it turns out that, on this small data set, a seek is actually slightly more expensive than a scan. Maybe with a large data set, the optimizer will choose a seek instead. –  Michael Liu Apr 6 '12 at 16:22
    
Scans aren't necessarily a bad thing. With this small of a data set, it's more efficient to suck the whole clustered index in in one go rather than do the seeks. I'm sure that there's a tipping point. –  Ben Thul Apr 6 '12 at 16:58
    
@BenThul: It's still rather mysterious why the optimizer chose a seek for one join and a scan for the other, when the two joins are (almost) the same. –  Michael Liu Apr 6 '12 at 17:02
1  
For what it's worth, you could avoid the final left join if your #arcs table also included entries with NULL parent for each root node: (1,NULL), (4,NULL), (5,NULL), (7,NULL). To do this in the actual table would require some changes in indexes and/or constraints, but it might be worth looking into. The outer query of the WITH statement would then be simply SELECT * FROM root_nodes WHERE parent_node IS NULL. You could also modify the CTE to add these extra entries (WITH augmentedArcs AS ...), and it might be worth trying such options if performance is less than you need. –  Steve Kass Apr 7 '12 at 1:53
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.