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In javascript I have the following:

var inf = id + '|' + city ;

if id or city are null then inf will be null.

Is there any slick way of saying if id or city are null make then blank.

I know in c# you can do the following:

var inf = (id ?? "") + (city ?? "");

Any similar method in javascript?

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Your question is a bit confusing. Please provide one ore more example values for inf. –  Felix Kling Apr 6 '12 at 15:52
    
possible duplicate of null coalescing operator for javascript? –  squint Apr 6 '12 at 16:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
var inf = (id == null ? '' : id) + '|' + (city == null ? '' : city)
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That's just a longer way to do what Elliot is doing in his answer –  nickf Apr 6 '12 at 15:54
2  
I have no idea why this was accepted instead of pysho's answer. –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 7 '12 at 14:38

How about:

var inf = [id, city].join('|');

EDIT: You can remove the "blank" parts before joining, so that if only one of id and city is null, inf will just contain that part and if both are null inf will be empty.

var inf = _([id, city]).compact().join('|'); // underscore.js
var inf = [id, city].compact().join('|'); // sugar.js
var inf = [id, city].filter(function(str) { return str; }).join('|'); // without helpers
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2  
Whoa, nice one. –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 6 '12 at 15:48
    
inf will not be blank , if id and city are nulls. –  Engineer Apr 6 '12 at 15:54
    
@Engineer: Yes, it'll be "|", the desired result. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 6 '12 at 15:55
    
@Rocket I know about "|", just read if id or city are null then inf will be null. of @Nate. –  Engineer Apr 6 '12 at 15:56

Total long shot, but try this:

var inf = (id || "") + "|" + (city || "");
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1  
I'd suggest adding parenthesis: var inf = (id || "") + "|" + (city || ""); –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 6 '12 at 15:48
1  
@ElliotBonneville it doesn't actually matter to the interpreter (since it's equivalent), but it will matter to your co-workers. –  nickf Apr 6 '12 at 15:50
1  
@nickf It does make a difference. Try it. –  NullUserException Apr 6 '12 at 15:51
2  
@Nate: It's an 'or' operator, which means this: var inf = (id if id is not undefined, otherwise use "") + "|" + (city if city is not undefined, otherwise use "") –  Elliot Bonneville Apr 6 '12 at 15:52
1  
@EliranMalka: This works for any value evaluating to false. So also 0, which might not be wanted. –  Felix Kling Apr 6 '12 at 15:54
var inf = (id && city) ? (id+"|"+city) : "";
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What if one or the other is null? He wanted each variable replaced with "" if it was null, not the whole thing. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 6 '12 at 16:00
    
@Rocket "if id or city are null then inf will be null", I think he wants empty string either one is null. –  xdazz Apr 7 '12 at 5:41

Equivalent to c# var inf = (id ?? "") + (city ?? ""); (if id and city are nullable) is

var inf = (id || '') + (city || '');

This is referred to as 'Short-Circuit Evaluation'. Nullability is not an issue in javascript (in js all variables are nullable), but id and city have to be assigned (but do not need a value, as in var id, city).

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if (id != ""){
inf = id;
if (city != ""){ inf += " | " + city ;}
}
else 
inf= city;
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