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I was trying to write a code where multiple threads call methods on a shared object to increment/decrement/print a counter stored in it. What I also want are these numbers to vascillate between 0 and 8. That is the output might look like something below: 0123234567654566677877666655....

Can somebody look at what I have cranked out and give me some pointers on whether I am on the right track:

My shared object:

public class SyncObj{
        private int i;
        public synchronized void inc(){
                if(i<8)
                  i++;
        }
        public synchronized void dec(){
                if(i > 0)
                   i--;
        }
        public synchronized void print(){
                System.out.print(i);
        }
}

To prevent starvation on the print and to make sure every inc/dec gets printed, I can have a private variable called hasPrinted and rewrite the class as follows:

public class SyncObj{
            private int i;
            //Changed Boolean to boolean as Keith Randall pointed out
            private boolean hasPrinted = false;
            public synchronized void inc(){
                    if(i<8 && hasPrinted){
                      i++;
                      hasPrinted = false;
                    }
            }
            public synchronized void dec(){
                    if(i > 0 && hasPrinted){
                       i--;
                       hasPrinted = false;
                    }
            }
            public synchronized void print(){
                    System.out.print(i);
                    hasPrinted = true;
            }
    }

Can somebody go over the above snippet and review it for pitfalls and gotchas?

Thanks

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Jeffrey, mre, Taymon, Daniel Fischer, Graviton Apr 10 '12 at 2:05

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I recommend you take a look at the java.util.concurrent package and use one of the mechanisms therein. –  mre Apr 6 '12 at 16:11
1  
Should probably belong on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Jeffrey Apr 6 '12 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should get used to using a queue for printing.

public class SyncObj {
  private volatile int i;
  private BlockingQueue<Integer> q = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Integer>();
  public synchronized void inc() {
    if (i < 8) {
      i++;
      q.add(i);
    }
  }
  public synchronized void dec() {
    if (i > 0) {
      i--;
      q.add(i);
    }
  }
  public void print() {
    for (Integer i = q.poll(); i != null; i = q.poll()) {
      System.out.print(i);
    }
  }
  private static volatile boolean stop = false;
  public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    final SyncObj o = new SyncObj();

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        while (!stop) {
          o.inc();
        }
      }
    }).start();

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        while (!stop) {
          o.dec();
        }
      }
    }).start();

    new Thread(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        while (!stop) {
          o.print();
        }
      }
    }).start();

    Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
    stop = true;
  }
}

My output looks like this:

1012345678765432101234567876543210123456787654321012345678765432101234567876543210123456787654321012345678

share|improve this answer
    
This is incredible. Thanks! –  sc_ray Apr 6 '12 at 20:55
    
I had a question about your print method. Is there a reason why you did for (Integer i = q.poll(); i != null; i =q.poll()){ System.out.print(i);} instead of System.out.println(q.take())? –  sc_ray Apr 7 '12 at 19:25
    
The idea behind that I would presume would be because take() blocks all other operations whereas poll() is non-blocking? –  sc_ray Apr 7 '12 at 20:28
    
@sc_ray If I had been able to do while ( Integer i = q.poll() != null ) I would have done. Another alternative might be q.drainTo(out) but also not allowed. All I really want to do is print as many as is available at the time. –  OldCurmudgeon Apr 8 '12 at 10:07
    
Got it. Thanks! –  sc_ray Apr 8 '12 at 18:36

Boolean -> boolean, no point in having an object instead of a primitive type.

Your first code is fine. Your second code doesn't solve your requirements of preventing starvation or making sure every inc/dec gets printed. Why not just have inc/dec print the value itself?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was trying to decouple the print from the dec/inc operation. Can you elaborate on why the second code will not make sure why every inc/dec gets printed? Wont the synchronized inc/dec flip the hasPrinted to false preventing any future incs/decs until the print has flipped the switch back to true after printing the value? –  sc_ray Apr 6 '12 at 16:18
    
Certainly the last inc/dec might not get printed. But from the callers' view, lots of inc/dec calls might not get printed, as they never even happen! That's a bad API. –  Keith Randall Apr 6 '12 at 16:24
    
I do see how the inc and dec operations are getting suppressed by the print operation by hinging on the print operation. Ideally, the prints should go along with the incs/decs like you said. But suppose the directive is to decouple the print operation from the other operations,are there ways to structure the print without pausing the inc or dec? –  sc_ray Apr 6 '12 at 16:32
    
I don't think so. You can force the inc/dec to wait for the print using a semaphore, but if you want inc/dec to never pause you're out of luck. –  Keith Randall Apr 6 '12 at 16:35
    
Thanks. Makes sense. –  sc_ray Apr 6 '12 at 16:46

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