Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got an interface and an implementation, both with [ProtoContract]. There is one property, which is read-only on the interface. When I try to deserialize a property declared as the interface, Protobuf gives me this error:

System.InvalidOperationException: Cannot apply changes to property IFoo.Id

Here's the code I'm testing with:

    public void Main()
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            var x = new HasFoo {TheFoo = new Foo(1)};

            Serializer.Serialize(ms, x);
            ms.Position = 0;
            var clone = Serializer.Deserialize<HasFoo>(ms);

            Assert.AreEqual(1, clone.TheFoo.Id);
        }
    }


    [ProtoContract, ProtoInclude(100, typeof(Foo))]
    public interface IFoo
    {
        [ProtoMember(1)]
        long Id { get; }
    }

    [ProtoContract]
    public class Foo : IFoo
    {
        [ProtoMember(1)]
        public long Id { get; private set; }

        public Foo() { }

        public Foo(long id)
        {
            Id = id;
        }
    }

    [ProtoContract]
    public class HasFoo
    {
        [ProtoMember(1)]
        public IFoo TheFoo { get; set; }
    }

I'd rather not declare a setter on the interface, and I'd like to keep the TheFoo property declared as IFoo if at all possible. Is there any way that can be made to work? I'm using protobuf-net v2.

share|improve this question
    
No you can't, the object is constructed and thus missing the chance to use your private set. –  Landern Apr 6 '12 at 16:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. When binding to an interface, it binds to the interface, so it can't exploit any private setters (etc) that would be available when binding to the concrete type. The only way you could do that would be to advertise the members of Foo for serialization instead of IFoo.

Note: in non-interface scenarios it will have access to the members, or even the direct field of desired.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.