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The GPL Licence makes a difference between "fork and excec" and dynamic linking.

This maybe because of the language barrier (I'm no native english speaker), but I don't get what dynamic linking means.

I found examples about dll libraries and stuff like that, but can someone give an example for say a PHP Build System?

E.g. does dynamic linking mean that the plugin has to include files from the GPL-licenced program or has to make API Calls?

I'm trying to understand what the licence of PlugIns are and am familiar with the following systems, so an example for them would be perfect:

  • Typo3
  • Moodle
  • Wordpress

Are plugins for these systems (that are published under GPL) requiered to redistribute under GPL?

When I buy a wordpress theme at themeforest they ship with a gpl licence but the t&c of the side says something else. So what is true?

And last but not least: If something is licenced under GPL (maybe because it must be), but not distributed but I have a copy of it (for example, because I worked in a company that wrote the code), am I allowed to distribute it for myself?

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Depends on the version. The GNU GPLv3 is more stringent on uncompiled code. However the GNU GPL 2 still impacts non-"linked" code if it's tied strongly enough; e.g. the plugin couldn't operate without the main application. Just reusing the API doesn't enforce the license though, and plugins might be released under different license. (Notice the conjunctive.) –  mario Apr 6 '12 at 17:53
    
Ok, but what does "linked" mean? Aren't plugins by definition tied to the main application? How could a plugin work without it? –  shredding Apr 6 '12 at 18:47
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Did you clarify which version your inquiry was about yet? Are you asking for legal advise, or arguing that templates should be GNU GPL covered? (both off-topic). The term "linking" is generally not applicable to interpreted code. –  mario Apr 6 '12 at 18:55
    
See below, i'm not looking for legal advice. your link did clarify my main question. –  shredding Apr 7 '12 at 6:37
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The GPL Licence makes a difference between "fork and excec" and dynamic linking.

No, the GPL License does not make a difference between "fork and exec" and dynamic linking. In fact the GNU GPL v2 does not care about linking at all.

This maybe because of the language barrier (I'm no native english speaker), but I don't get what dynamic linking means.

I found examples about dll libraries and stuff like that, but can someone give an example for say a PHP Build System?

For your cases about interpreted PHP code, you can just ignore it. Dynamic linking is a term related to binary software that becomes compiled to machine code and is shipped as such (which is not “source code” for the work, the GPL defines this as the preferred form of the work for making changes in it Ref).

E.g. does dynamic linking mean that the plugin has to include files from the GPL-licenced program or has to make API Calls?

What exactly dynamic linking means differs who you ask. It's generally accepted that it is related to binary files, however the term itself is not technically strictly defined and not legally binding at all.

I'm trying to understand what the licence of PlugIns are and am familiar with the following systems, so an example for them would be perfect:

  • Typo3
  • Moodle
  • Wordpress

Are plugins for these systems (that are published under GPL) requiered to redistribute under GPL?

Yes, the GNU GPL has copyleft, which means, that the software need to stay under the same terms. That's like if you would by a DVD: The type of licensing needs to stay with the DVD even if you redistribute an illegal copy of it.

BTW, what a plugin is and what not is even much more undefined than dynamic linking. As plugins often share a lot of their nature with what they plug into (like mother and child, the main software gives birth to a plugin while alone the plugin wouldn't come to life).

So often plugins are just additional files with the intend to change and extend the functionality of an existing software. Most often they are not a work of it's own (independent). As this is about changing a software under the GPL, usage rights and requirements need to be matched. As GPL is copyleft, for so called plugins it applies as well.

When I buy a wordpress theme at themeforest they ship with a gpl licence but the t&c of the side says something else. So what is true?

If both T&C and the license are shipping with the package and are actually contradictory, then you should clarify this with the vendor. Tell the vendor that you suspect you will loose any usage rights for Wordpress which would render buying the theme useless and ask what you should do now and what Themeforest's suggestion is to solve your problem. Sometimes what looks contradictory isn't and sometimes just wrong impressions are created but there ain't no real binding contract behind it.

And last but not least: If something is licenced under GPL (maybe because it must be), but not distributed but I have a copy of it (for example, because I worked in a company that wrote the code), am I allowed to distribute it for myself?

That depends, and you need to be careful here, consider the following (imaginary) scenario:

It might be that some software is distributed under GPL, let's call it GreatBuzz a software to mass-publish messages to (micro)blogs and (a-)social media sites, written by Janet Krentel and a community of contributors.

The company quakMarket is making use of GreatBuzz within their company. And quakMarket is continuesly extending that software by it's employee Karen Duval who is a software developer.

Even GreatBuzz is under GPL, the changes made in-house by quakMarket are done for quakMarket's own good and by the company itself (they own the copyright for the changes). So that code must not be under GPL as it has not been distributed yet.

So with the GPL it's your own freedom to extend the software, and as long as you don't distribute your changes, you don't need to distribute them under GPL.

So what you ask for might or might not be true. Only in case the changes are distributed, that distributed copy/ies is available under GPL. If you don't have access to a distributed copy, you don't have access under the GPL.

So better double-check that a license that lies in some directory is actually binding for all files in there. Also only because a company creates packages that target GPL distribution, and especially if that distribution is commercial, it must not mean that employees of that company are automatically allowed to get a copy of the GPL'ed package w/o paying for it first as everybody else would be required to do.

As your question relates to a employee/company situation, you should be careful and check that with a lawyer on your behalf, because interests in software can be high, damages can occur and you might become legally responsible for some loss or damage if what you intend to do is not legally safe.

Especially if you can't clearly say: That GPL'ed software package has been distributed to me. So better take care.

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Thanks, that answers my question in depth! –  shredding Apr 7 '12 at 9:23
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The GPL does not fully define what constitutes "linking", especially in GPLv2 (which was written primarily with compiled applications in mind). The Software Freedom Law Center's opinion on WordPress themes and the GPL is illuminating, though:

https://wordpress.org/news/2009/07/themes-are-gpl-too/

Briefly put, the term "linking" is expanded somewhat for interpreted languages to encompass any situation where code is loaded into the same memory space (or interpreter) as GPLed code. As such, the PHP components of WordPress themes must be GPLed, but other components (e.g, images and CSS) need not, since they are not treated as code by the PHP interpreter.

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First off, I am not a lawyer, and everything that follows is not legal advice.

GPL, as interpreted by many of the popular open source CMSes you linked to, do consider Themes, Plugins, Modules, and the like to be covered by the viral aspects of the GPL. As @duskwuff pointed out, this is due to the fact that plugins/themes have to run in the same process space as the parent application and can (mostly) not run on their own, without the main application.

That said, the GPL really is only applicable if you intend to distribute your plugins, for pay or for free. However, it should be noted that this does not apply to you writing plugins for clients or employers who will likely be the only user of this code. Most of the organizations behind these open source apps won't host your code unless its licence complies with theirs, such as on the WordPress "Extend" Pages where you can download plugins and themes. Generally this means choosing GPLv2 or GPLv3.

The GPL debate has swept though the WordPress community (where I used to be pretty active) more than once in recent memory and the last time it happened pretty much all 'premium' theme and plugin authors that were previously resisting doing that have have all adopted the GPL license for their work. I wrote about that debate in more detail here: http://xentek.net/articles/826/you-got-gpl-in-my-peanut-butter/

As for purchasing premium themes, there are a few different things that are implied... Yes the core work (at least the php code) is indeed GPL. That technically means you can do ANYTHING with it that the GPL licences allows, including modifying and redistributing (under the GPL of course). However, the other Terms and Conditions also apply, and likely apply more to the non-GPL parts of your purchase (custom CSS, Images, JavaScript, etc).

And finally:

If something is licenced under GPL (maybe because it must be), but not distributed but I have a copy of it (for example, because I worked in a company that wrote the code), am I allowed to distribute it for myself?

I take your question to mean: "Can I reuse code I wrote on other projects I am working on without being burdened by the GPL?" As long as your not trying to distribute them outside of your own client/employer work... then your code does not have to be GPL. Your previous employers/clients may have a say in how you (re)use that code, but unless you plan to put upa zip file up on your site, for example, then you won't really have to think about the license of the code at all, since its yours and your copyright still very much applies. Actually, your copyright always applies, even under the GPL, but you would not be compelled to apply the GPL to that bespoke code in those cases if you didn't want to.

P.S. - This FAQ on Drupal's site may also be helpful: http://drupal.org/licensing/faq/

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Thank you. I'm not looking for a lawyer, nor want I to take code from others or my company. I just did not have an idea of the practical consequences, now its more clear, especially about the nature of dynamic linking, which seems not to be something to describe interpreted code. Thank you for your links, I will read them and the discussions carefully. –  shredding Apr 6 '12 at 19:58
    
Even if not everything must be technically under GPL (e.g. CSS, images), the moment it's distributed as one package under GPL it often happens, that those parts are under GPL as well. Just saying. –  hakre Apr 7 '12 at 9:11
    
@hakre that's not really true. Each part can be licensed under different terms. –  xentek Apr 11 '12 at 21:46
    
@xentek: Sure, not only can each part be licensed under different terms, but explicitly and under multiple terms at once, e.g. the GPL per it's requirements for package based distribution every file there-in under GPL and fragments in the package under BSD (for example). The really true is to grasp the broader look and take distribution requirements as well as part licensing. –  hakre Apr 11 '12 at 21:58
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I will answer just this one part:

And last but not least: If something is licenced under GPL (maybe because it must be), but not distributed but I have a copy of it (for example, because I worked in a company that wrote the code), am I allowed to distribute it for myself?

Standard IANAL disclaimer.

The answer in most cases is 'no'. You were not the one to whom the license was given (it's your previous company), so you're not entitled to any terms of the license. You were given the access to the code as an employee of the company you worked for, and once your contract ended, you should have destroyed all copies of that code in your posession.

In short, to be able to redistribute that code under terms of GPL, you need your company to distribute this software to you personally (not as an employee, but as a private person or another company)

Your mileage might vary depending on how your contract with the company was worded though.

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This is useful. But could I use parts of the code for own projects, because I wrote it or does the copyright belongs to the company? This is hypothetical. –  shredding Apr 6 '12 at 20:38
    
The copyright most likely (again, depending on your contract) belongs to the company. –  Mchl Apr 8 '12 at 21:25
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