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I am trying to read data from a Berkeley DB file of size > 12 GB and write to a text file in key value pairs. But I am not able to do so, as my process stops after reading 26 million records. I tried reading the file using perl/ruby, but it seems the object which takes the record is just able to hold 26 million records. Is there some way to split the BDB file and then read the records? Or if I could find some way to read data in chunks and then process them?

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If u show your code maybe someone could help you to fix it. –  matthias krull Apr 6 '12 at 21:25

1 Answer 1

There is little to say without sight of your code. Are you using the BerkeleyDB module? Is the file in the form of a hash table? You have tagged your question with both Perl and Java; hav you tried reading the file using Java as well as Perl and Ruby?

You may have hit a virtual memory limit using Perl, as the supporting data for hashes and scalar values is enormous compared with the simple strings in C and the like.

I doubt if there is a way of splitting a Berkely DB file, but the requirement is simple and could be written in only a few lines of C.

Please show your Perl code if you want help with it, or rewrite it in C or Java. Once the data is stored as key/value pairs in a text file Perl can handle it easily.


Edit

I suggest you use the native Berkely DB API provided by the DB_File module. That will avoid keeping all of the data in a single Perl hash and is likely to solve your problem.

This code compiles but is tested only on minimal data as I obviously have no access to your DB file.

use strict;
use warnings;

use DB_File;

my $db = tie my %dbhash, 'DB_File', 'TestId', O_RDONLY, 0644, $DB_BTREE
    or die "Cannot open file 'TestId' :$!\n";

my $file = 0;
my $fh;
my $c = 0;

my ($key, $val);

my $stat = $db->seq($key, $val, R_FIRST);
while ($stat == 0) {

  if (not $fh or $c == 10_000_000) {
    $file++;
    open $fh, '>', "TestId$file.txt" or die $!;
    $c = 0;
  }

  print $fh "$key|$val\n";
  $c++;
}
continue {
  $stat = $db->seq($key, $val, R_NEXT);
}
close $fh or die $!;

undef $db;
untie %dbhash;

Edit 2

If that approach to using DB_File has the same problem then I suggest you try the BerkeleyDB module instead. It is written by the same author but has an interface that appears to be independent of Perl's hashes.

Here is the equivalent code to my previous attempt using the alternative module. It works fine on a minimal data set. If this also fails to work then I suggest you drop a line to the modules' author Paul Marquess

use strict;
use warnings;

use BerkeleyDB;

my $db = BerkeleyDB::Btree->new(-Filename => 'TestId')
    or die "Cannot open file 'TestId' :$!\n";

my $cursor = $db->db_cursor;

my $file = 0;
my $fh;
my $c = 0;

my $key = my $val = "";

my $stat = $cursor->c_get($key, $val, DB_FIRST);
while ($stat == 0) {

  if (not $fh or $c == 10_000_000) {
    $file++;
    open $fh, '>', "TestId$file.txt" or die $!;
    $c = 0;
  }

  print $fh "$key|$val\n";
  $c++;
}
continue {
  $stat = $cursor->c_get($key, $val, DB_NEXT);
}

close $fh or die $!;
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Do you know how I can do the same using java ? –  vikknp Apr 9 '12 at 21:41
    
I am not familiar with a Java library for Berkely DB, but I believe your problem can be solved by using the native API provided by the Perl DB_File module. I have added to my answer to demonstrate. –  Borodin Apr 10 '12 at 4:40
    
This doesn't help. It again created 3 files 2 with 10million records and last with 6 million. So it seems that it still keeps the data in a single hash. my $db = tie my %dbhash, 'DB_File', 'TestId', O_RDONLY, 0644, $DB_BTREE or die "Cannot open file 'TestId' :$!\n"; –  vikknp Apr 10 '12 at 6:24
    
Did you change the code for the loop as well? –  Borodin Apr 10 '12 at 10:18
    
No I used the same code as above, without changing anything. –  vikknp Apr 10 '12 at 12:32

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