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Suppose I have a view in which some of the column names are aliases, like "surName" in this example:

CREATE VIEW myView AS
    SELECT  
            firstName,
            middleName,
            you.lastName surName
    FROM 
            myTable me
            LEFT OUTER JOIN yourTable you
            ON me.code = you.code
GO

I'm able to retrieve some information about the view using the INFORMATION_SCHEMA views.
For example, the query

SELECT column_name AS ALIAS, data_type AS TYPE
FROM information_schema.columns 
WHERE table_name = 'myView'

yields:

 ----------------
|ALIAS     |TYPE |
 ----------------
|firstName |nchar|
|middleName|nchar|
|surName   |nchar|
 ----------------

However, I would like to know the actual column name as well. Ideally:

 ---------------------------
|ALIAS     |TYPE |REALNAME  |
 ---------------------------
|firstName |nchar|firstName |
|middleName|nchar|middleName|
|surName   |nchar|lastName  |
 ---------------------------

How can I determine what the real column name is based on the alias? There must be some way to use the sys tables and/or INFORMATION_SCHEMA views to retrieve this information.


EDIT: I can get close with this abomination, which is similar to Arion's answer:

SELECT
    c.name AS ALIAS,
    ISNULL(type_name(c.system_type_id), t.name) AS DATA_TYPE,
    tablecols.name AS REALNAME
FROM 
    sys.views v
    JOIN sys.columns c ON c.object_id = v.object_id
    LEFT JOIN sys.types t ON c.user_type_id = t.user_type_id
    JOIN sys.sql_dependencies d ON d.object_id = v.object_id 
        AND c.column_id = d.referenced_minor_id
    JOIN sys.columns tablecols ON d.referenced_major_id = tablecols.object_id 
        AND tablecols.column_id = d.referenced_minor_id 
        AND tablecols.column_id = c.column_id
WHERE v.name ='myView'

This yields:

 ---------------------------
|ALIAS     |TYPE |REALNAME  |
 ---------------------------
|firstName |nchar|firstName |
|middleName|nchar|middleName|
|surName   |nchar|code      |
|surName   |nchar|lastName  |
 ---------------------------

but the third record is wrong -- this happens with any view created using a "JOIN" clause, because there are two columns with the same "column_id", but in different tables.

share|improve this question
    
afaik, regular syntax for column alias is using AS: select columnA as columnB from t –  abatishchev Apr 6 '12 at 19:13
2  
The real name for a view may not even be a column, so there is no way of doing this. What would be the name of the column in this view ? Create view a as select 1 b –  t-clausen.dk Apr 6 '12 at 22:30
    
So long as the VIEW_METADATA option is not set when creating the view SQL Server will return to the DB-Library, ODBC, and OLE DB APIs Browse-mode metadata including information about the base table that the columns in the result set belong to. Never looked at this aspect myself though. –  Martin Smith Apr 9 '12 at 22:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Given this view:

CREATE VIEW viewTest
AS
SELECT
    books.id,
    books.author,
    Books.title AS Name
FROM
    Books

What I can see you can get the columns used and the tables used by doing this:

SELECT * 
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEW_COLUMN_USAGE AS UsedColumns 
WHERE UsedColumns.VIEW_NAME='viewTest'

SELECT * 
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEW_TABLE_USAGE AS UsedTables 
WHERE UsedTables.VIEW_NAME='viewTest'

This is for sql server 2005+. See reference here

Edit

Give the same view. Try this query:

SELECT
    c.name AS columnName,
    columnTypes.name as dataType,
    aliases.name as alias
FROM 
sys.views v 
JOIN sys.sql_dependencies d 
    ON d.object_id = v.object_id
JOIN .sys.objects t 
    ON t.object_id = d.referenced_major_id
JOIN sys.columns c 
    ON c.object_id = d.referenced_major_id 
JOIN sys.types AS columnTypes 
    ON c.user_type_id=columnTypes.user_type_id
    AND c.column_id = d.referenced_minor_id
JOIN sys.columns AS aliases
    on c.column_id=aliases.column_id
    AND aliases.object_id = object_id('viewTest')
WHERE
    v.name = 'viewTest';

It returns this for me:

columnName  dataType  alias

id          int       id
author      varchar   author
title       varchar   Name

This is also tested in sql 2005+

share|improve this answer
    
This is interesting, but there's nothing I can see in the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEW_COLUMN_USAGE view that could be used in a join on in order to map to the alias name. In my example, the columns are returned in a different order. For INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS, there's an "ORDINAL POSITION". No such luck for INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEW_COLUMN_USAGE. –  justingarrick Apr 9 '12 at 12:52
    
Updated the answer.. Have look:P –  Arion Apr 9 '12 at 15:39
    
Thanks, this is essentially what I can up with myself using sp_helptext to "reverse engineer" the INFORMATION_SCHEMA views, but your query suffers from the same problem as mine -- it will fail if the view is created from a JOIN. For example, it maps both the 'lastName' and 'code' fields to the 'surName' alias in my example. I will update the question to reflect this. –  justingarrick Apr 9 '12 at 15:50
    
Can you try my query against your data? Because when I tried it, it looked like the result you are expecting. –  Arion Apr 9 '12 at 21:32
    
Yes, I did. It has the same issue as my query with the "code" field used in the JOIN clause. –  justingarrick Apr 10 '12 at 12:42

I think you can't.

Select query hides actual data source it was performed against. Because you can query anything, i.e. view, table, even linked remote server.

share|improve this answer
    
@Segphault: Why do you downvote my answer without a comment? Don't you agree? Okay. But that's not a reason for downvote, imo. –  abatishchev Apr 6 '12 at 19:20
    
Makes sense. One use of a View is to hide the details from prying eyes. Have to expose the type for it to be consumed. +1 –  Blam Apr 6 '12 at 19:47

Not a Perfect solution; but, it is possible to parse the view_definition with a high degree of accuracy especially if the code is well organized with consistent aliasing by 'as'. Additionally, one can parse for a comma ',' after the alias.

Of note: the final field in the select clause will not have the comma and I was unable to exclude items being used as comments (for example interlaced in the view text with --)

I wrote the below for a table named 'My_Table' and view correspondingly called 'vMy_Table'

select alias, t.COLUMN_name
from 
(
select VC.COLUMN_NAME, 



case when
ROW_NUMBER () OVER (
partition by C.COLUMN_NAME order by 
CHARINDEX(',',VIEW_DEFINITION,CHARINDEX(C.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION))- 
CHARINDEX(VC.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION)

) = 1

then 1
else 0 end
as lenDiff



,C.COLUMN_NAME as alias

 ,CHARINDEX(',',VIEW_DEFINITION,CHARINDEX(C.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION)) diff1
 , CHARINDEX(VC.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION) diff2

 from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEW_COLUMN_USAGE VC
inner join INFORMATION_SCHEMA.VIEWS V on V.TABLE_NAME = 'v'+VC.TABLE_Name
inner join information_schema.COLUMNS C on C.TABLE_NAME = 'v'+VC.TABLE_Name
where VC.TABLE_NAME = 'My_Table'
and CHARINDEX(',',VIEW_DEFINITION,CHARINDEX(C.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION))- 
CHARINDEX(VC.COLUMN_NAME,VIEW_DEFINITION) >0
)
t

where lenDiff = 1 

Hope this helps and I look forward to your feedback

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