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I spent around two hours on that problem, and I have visited these stackoverflow questions before:

c++ passing a const object reference to a function

Passing const& as a function argument

both did not help me, so I am specifying my problem here:

1) I have a class Polygon that stores Point2Ds in a list. The class has among others two member functions:

public:    
  std::pair<Point2D,Point2D> closestPts()  const;
private:
  Tripel const& findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P,
                                std::vector<Point2D> const& X,
                                std::vector<Point2D> const& Y) const;

2) The class also contains a struct Triple that is the return value of the function findClosestPts. I need that, because the function needs to return two points and one distance:

struct Tripel {
  Point2D pt1;
  Point2D pt2;
  float   dist;
};

The problem is now in the implementation of Polygon.cpp. This is my (current) code for the two above mentioned functions:

std::pair<Point2D,Point2D> Polygon::closestPts() const {
   ...
   int size = m_points.size();
   std::vector<Point2D> P (size);
   std::vector<Point2D> X (size);
   std::vector<Point2D> Y (size);
   ...
   // some manipulation of the vectors, filling them with Point2D
   // at this point, I have three non-const std::vector<Point2D>

   // try to call the other function       
   Tripel closPts = findClosestPts(P, X, Y);
   ...
}

Tripel const& findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P, std::vector<Point2D> const& X, std::vector<Point2D> const& Y) const {
   ...
}

The compiler error is:

error: non-member function 'const Tripel& findClosestPts(...)' cannot have cv-qualifier

So I guess I am not allowed to make this function const, because it returns a struct. Is that true?

Anyways, I changed the function signature to this:

Tripel const& findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P,
                              std::vector<Point2D> const& X,
                              std::vector<Point2D> const& Y);

So, the function is not const anymore. This leads to the following compiling error:

error: passing 'const Polygon' as 'this' argument of 'const Tripel& Polygon::findClosestPts(...)' discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]

I do not know, what to do now. I tried pretty much everything, deleting all the const statements, changing them around, making findClosestPts public, making it const again, making the three std::vectors const before passing them into the other function ... but everything leaded to (different) compiling errors.

So my question is, how do I need to write the two functions, to achieve the following: I want to have a function closestPoints() that is a public member function and that returns the pair of the two closest points. For that it needs an auxilary, private member function findClosestPts(vector1, vector2, vector3) that returns the above mentioned struct Triple?

I would be happy about help, because I am stucked here since a while :/

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you want to return a const reference? This could easily lead to a dangling reference. Triple seems to be a value type anyway. –  Andre Apr 6 '12 at 20:08
    
Confusion: Is Triple === Tripel ? –  Robᵩ Apr 6 '12 at 20:13
    
@Robᵩ I'm pretty sure they mean the same? English vs. German. ;-) –  Andre Apr 6 '12 at 20:37
    
oh yeah... that was a typo ;) And yes, you guessed my nationality correctly :) –  MenschMarcus Apr 7 '12 at 11:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can make it const, you just forgot to qualify the name in the implementation.

          //class name
                ||
                \/
Tripel const& Polygon::findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P, 
           std::vector<Point2D> const& X, std::vector<Point2D> const& Y) const
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for spotting those loathsome syntax errors –  D.Shawley Apr 6 '12 at 20:11
    
Bloody hell that was quick typing, I thought I was pretty fast –  EdChum Apr 6 '12 at 20:11

The clue is in the error message:

error: non-member function ...

At that point you can stop reading, because your compiler thinks your function is a non-member function. Any further text on that line is based on your compiler making an incorrect conclusion (based on what you wanted). The solution is to add the Polygon:: qualifier to your member function implementation:

Tripel const& Polygon::findClosestPts( ...
share|improve this answer
    
yep... that was it :) –  MenschMarcus Apr 7 '12 at 16:12

You need to qualify the function name with the class name like

Tripel const& Polygon::findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P, std::vector<Point2D> const& X, std::vector<Point2D> const& Y) const

Luchian beat me to it but the error tells you that Non-member cannot have cv qualifier, for the same reason that static functions cannot be cv qualified

share|improve this answer

Please note you'd better return here:

Tripel const& findClosestPts (std::vector<Point2D> const& P,  
                                std::vector<Point2D> const& X,
                                std::vector<Point2D> const& Y) const;

the value of Tripel, not the reference to it. As someone noted already, this is not safe to return a reference.

Such functions almost always must return a value, not a reference, as otherwise you will need to keep lifetime of the object returning the reference with lifetime of object/code accepting the reference in correspondence. That is, lifetime of the returning object must be kept within of lifetime of receiving object or code.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, that was helpful! –  MenschMarcus Apr 7 '12 at 16:12
    
but one more question: Should I now return it const or just like that? –  MenschMarcus Apr 7 '12 at 16:13
    
If you return an object by value, this is always a temporary object and it does not matter if it is CONST or not (or any other modifier like volatile etc), because the object cannot be actually reused, it fully belongs to the accepting code, so there is no need to restrict anything here. ~ 90% of code in C++ return objects by value without modifiers. –  masterziv Sep 10 '13 at 11:13

Okay... this would have not been worth all that work... I simply forgot the class qualifier Polygon:: That is really embarrassing, I am sorry :(

Thank you all for your help, I think the problem is solved!

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