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I have a generic class NamedValue<TValue>:

public class NamedValue<TValue>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public TValue Value { get; set; }
}

I have a second generic class, NamedValueSource<TValue> that contains a List<NamedValue<TValue>>:

public class NamedValueSource<TValue>
{
    public List<NamedValue<TValue>> NamedValues { get; set; }

    public NamedValueSource()
    {
        NamedValues = GetNamedValues().Cast<NamedValue<TValue>>().ToList();
    }

    private IEnumerable<NamedValue<bool>> GetNamedValues()
    {
        var yesNamedValue = new NamedValue<bool> { Name = "Yes", Value = true };
        var noNamedValue = new NamedValue<bool> { Name = "Yes", Value = false };
        yield return yesNamedValue;
        yield return noNamedValue;
    }
}

The following test code works perfectly (the assertion passes):

public class Tester
{
    public Tester()
    {
        var source = new NamedValueSource<bool>();
        Debug.Assert(source.NamedValues[0].Name == "Yes");
    }
}

Now, here's the interesting part. If I attempt to perform the cast within GetNamedValues(), the code won't compile:

public class NamedValueSourceFail<TValue>
{
    public List<NamedValue<TValue>> NamedValues { get; set; }

    public NamedValueSourceFail()
    {
        NamedValues = GetNamedValues().ToList();
    }

    private IEnumerable<NamedValue<TValue>> GetNamedValues()
    {
        var yesNamedValue = new NamedValue<bool> { Name = "Yes", Value = true };
        var noNamedValue = new NamedValue<bool> { Name = "Yes", Value = false };
        yield return (NamedValue<TValue>)yesNamedValue; // ERROR: cannot convert type
        yield return (NamedValue<TValue>)noNamedValue; // ERROR: cannot convert type
    }
}

Why does NamedValueSource<TValue> compile while NamedValueSourceFail<TValue> errors out? Specifically, why am I able to perform the cast using Linq but not with good ol' parantheses?

Edit

In case it's not entirely clear from the comment thread of the accepted answer, I simply needed to convert to object first, then I would be allowed to cast to NamedValue<TValue>. This is probably how the Linq Cast method works behind the scenes.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In your second example, you're trying to convert NamedValue<bool> to NamedValue<TValue> -- this won't work, because the conversion has to be valid for any type argument. You can't convert NamedValue<bool> to NamedValue<int> or NamedValue<string> or NamedValue<AnythingElseOtherThanBool>.

One solution is to make NamedValueSource<TValue> abstract, as well as its GetNamedValues() method, and then create a class BooleanNamedValueSource : NamedValueSource<bool> class to use in your test.

In the linq case, the cast is not being done by the compiler; the cast occurs in a method that has already been compiled. All the compiler knows is that it is calling a method that takes IEnumerable<bool> and returns IEnumerable<TValue>. The specifics of that conversion are entirely invisible to the compiler.

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I get why it won't work for the second example...what I don't get is why it does work for the first example. –  devuxer Apr 6 '12 at 20:31
    
You said that the compiler works for the first example, does it actually work at runtime though? According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb341406.aspx it will be a deferred execution meaning that the cast won't be evaluated until runtime, and if it is invalid then an exeception will be thrown. –  scwagner Apr 6 '12 at 20:33
    
Because in the first example, the return type of the method is IEnumerable<NamedValue<bool>>. This means, among other things, that if you made a NamedValueSource<string> instance with that implementation, its GetNamedValues method would return a sequence of NamedValue<bool> -- not what you want, of course, but it should help explain why the method compiles and runs. –  phoog Apr 6 '12 at 20:33
    
@scwagner yes, it should work, because the method's return type is IEnumerable<NamedValue<bool>>, so of course you can yield return the objects. The problem is that this means that all NamedValueSource<TValue> return sequences of NamedValue<bool>, which is no doubt an incorrect implementation. –  phoog Apr 6 '12 at 20:35
    
@phoog, But why should it matter whether I cast before or after I receive the result? Look at the Cast Linq expression in the first example. It's the same exact cast I'm not allowed to do in the second example. –  devuxer Apr 6 '12 at 20:36

UPDATE: This question was the subject of my blog on July 10th 2012; thanks for the great question!


Let's greatly simplify your complicated program.

public static class X
{
    public static V Cast<V>(object o) { return (V)o; }
}

class C<T> {}
class D<U>
{
    public C<U> value;
    public D()
    {
        this.value = X.Cast<C<U>>(new C<bool>());
    }
}

Now your second version, simplified:

class C<T> {}
class D<U>
{
    public C<U> value;
    public D()
    {
        this.value = (C<U>)(new C<bool>());
    }
}

OK, so now let's ask some questions.

Why does the second program fail at compile time?

Because there is no conversion from C<bool> to C<U> for arbitrary U. The compiler knows that the only way this could possibly succeed is is U is always bool, and therefore this program is almost certainly wrong! The compiler assumes that U is going to be something other than bool some of the time.

Why then does the first program succeed at compile time?

The compiler has no idea that a method named "X.Cast" should be treated like a cast operator for the purposes of error detection! As far as the compiler is concerned, the Cast method is a method that takes an object in and returns a V for whatever type parameter is provided for V. When compiling the body of the ctor of D, the compiler has no idea whatsoever that some method, which probably isn't even in this program to begin with, is going to try to do a cast that is going to fail unless U happens to be bool.

The compiler simply has no basis upon which to treat the first version as an error, even though it most certainly is a deeply wrong program. You'll have to wait until runtime to find out that your program is wrong.

Now let's make a third version of your program:

class C<T> {}
class D<U>
{
    public C<U> value;
    public D()
    {
        this.value = (C<U>)(object)(new C<bool>());
    }
}

This succeeds at compile time, so let's ask:

Why does this succeed at compile time?

For the exact same reason that the first one succeeds at compile time. When you inserted the cast you effectively said that you wanted the newly constructed C<bool> to be treated as an object, and so for the rest of the analysis of this expression, that expression is considered to be of type object, and not the more specific type C<bool>.

So then why is it legal to cast object to C<U> in this case? Or for that matter, to V in the first case?

It is legal to cast object to V because V could be the type of the object, a base type of the object or an interface implemented by the object, so the compiler allows the conversion because it figures there are a lot of ways it could possibly succeed.

Basically, it is legal to cast object to anything that you could convert to object. You cannot cast object to a pointer type, for instance, because no pointer type can be cast to object. But everything else is fair game.

By making the cast to object first, you are removing information from the purview of the compiler; you are saying "ignore the fact that you know this is always C<bool> for the purposes of error detection.

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Thanks, Eric. The key nugget of info I wasn't getting is that if you first cast an instance of a specific type to an object (boxing), you are then free to cast it to anything. This will defer the validation check to runtime. –  devuxer Apr 6 '12 at 21:03
1  
@DanM correct, except that casting to object is not boxing unless the thing you're casting is a struct/value type. Boxing does not apply to classes/reference types. –  phoog Apr 6 '12 at 21:06
    
+1 Good examples –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 6 '12 at 21:09
    
Well we have to upvote him yet again:) - I knew all this but you always here something new on how things work (I was always treating this as 'closed' vs 'open' generic types and it's logical it cannot work - but I haven't been thinking like a 'compiler') –  NSGaga Apr 6 '12 at 21:28
    
@phoog, An interesting wrinkle in all this: Let's say you have a double myDouble set to 1.0. Now you want to cast it to a TNumber (TNumber happens to be an int, but this isn't known until runtime). Using var myValue = (TNumber)(object)myDouble will fail. This surprised me a bit because int myInt = (int)myDouble would have succeeded. So basically, if you know TNumber is some kind of number, there seems to be no easy way out of this besides checking if typeof(TValue) is an int, then doing (TValue)(object)Convert.ToInt32(myDouble). –  devuxer Apr 10 '12 at 22:49

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