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What I am trying to do, is create a method, that has a string and a character as parameters, the method then takes the string and searches for the given character. If the string contains that character, it returns an array of integers of where the character showed up. Here is what I have so far:

public class Sheet {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String string = "bbnnbb";
    String complete = null;
    //*******
    for(int i = 0; i < string.length(); i++){
        complete = StringSearch(string,'n').toString();
    }
            //********
}

public static int[] StringSearch(String string, char lookfor) {
    int[]num = new int[string.length()];
    for(int i = 0; i < num.length; i++){
        if(string.charAt(i)== lookfor){
            num[i] = i;
        }
    }
    return num;
}

}

The method works fine, and returns this:

0
0
2
3
0
0

What I am trying to do, is make those into 1 string so it would look like this "002300". Is there any possible way of doing this? I have tried to do it in the starred area of the code, but I have had no success.

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2  
Why the downvote? Doesn't seem that bad a question, the op seems to be new to Java. –  nikhil Apr 6 '12 at 21:02
    
The "harder" part of your task is ready... just iterator through the int[] and use += operator. –  dexametason Apr 6 '12 at 21:02
    
I'm guessing you are new to Java as you have violated naming conventions. When naming methods and variables (unless it is declared final), the first word is not capitalized, but subsequent words are capitalized. For example: thisIsCorrect() Happy coding! :) –  fireshadow52 Apr 6 '12 at 21:06
    
The code you posted does not print what you said it prints. In fact, the code you posted doesn't print anything. And if you were to print the value of complete, it would simply print the hashcode of the returned array (e.g. [I@190d11) Why don't you show the actual full code you are using? –  Mike Clark Apr 6 '12 at 21:51
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

just do

StringBuffer strBuff = new StringBuffer();
for(int i = 0; i<str.length(); i++)
{
    if(str.charAt(i) == reqChar)
    {
        strBuff.append(str.charAt(i));
    }
    else
    {
        strBuff.append('0');
    }
}
return str.toString();
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3  
+1 for StringBuffer –  dexametason Apr 6 '12 at 21:02
4  
You should use StringBuilder instead as it's not synchronized. –  Steve Kuo Apr 6 '12 at 21:04
    
@SteveKuo +1 for StringBuilder –  jpm Apr 6 '12 at 21:08
    
Why did this get so many voteups? Because there is StringBuffer..? str.char(i) is not even valid code. And if it was, it looks like he is trying to append the actual char value instead of the index. Also, OP wanted appended 0's for no match (idk why, but yea) –  Shredder Apr 6 '12 at 21:52
    
@SteveKuo: You are right, I just didn't know if this was a multithreaded application. :) –  noMAD Apr 6 '12 at 22:11
show 1 more comment

Just add the result to the existing string with the += operator

String complete = "";
for(...)
    complete += StringSearch(string,'n').toString();
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1  
Even though in this case, it's not a Big Deal(tm), we should be in the habit of using StringBuilder.append() instead of raw string concatenation. –  jpm Apr 6 '12 at 21:02
    
You are right. But this is a beginners question. And I think the basic stuff will do. –  juergen d Apr 6 '12 at 21:03
1  
I must agree with jpm. It must be done with StringBuffer because this is the use case of StringBuffers. –  dexametason Apr 6 '12 at 21:04
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I would just use java's regex library, that way it's more flexible (eg if you want to look for more than just a single character). Plus it's highly optimized.

StringBuilder positions = "";

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(string);
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(lookfor);
while(matcher.find()){
    positions.append(matcher.start());
}

return positions;
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Updated with StringBuilder for better practices.

public static String StringSearch(String string, char lookfor) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for(int i = 0; i < string.length; i++){
        if(string.charAt(i) == lookfor)
            sb.append(i);
        else
            sb.append("0");
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

Then you can just call it once, without a for loop. Not sure why you call it for every character in the string.

complete = StringSearch(string,'n');
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