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I'm trying to write more efficient code in a C program, and I need some help getting my pointers and assignments correct. I've shown two methods below, each using the following declarations and strncpy:

int kk, arraysize;
char person_name[100] = "";
char * array_person_name, * array_param;
...
strncpy(person_name, "John Smith", 100);
arraysize = <this value is downloaded from database>;
...

Method A (rectangular array):

array_person_name = malloc( sizeof(char) * arraysize *100 );
array_param = malloc( sizeof(char) * arraysize * 2 );
for (kk = 0; kk < arraysize; kk++) {
    strncpy(array_person_name[kk], person_name, 100);
    strncpy(array_param[kk], "bt", 2);
}

Method B (ragged array):

for (kk = 0; kk < arraysize; kk++) {
array_person_name[kk] = &person_name;
array_param[kk] = "bt";
}

Notice that the arrays I'm trying to create place the same value into each element of the array. Method A is an (rectangular) array of arraysize elements, each element itself being an array of 100 characters. Method B attempts not to waste storage space by creating an (ragged) array of arraysize elements, where each element is a pointer-to-char.

QUESTION 1: Am I allocating memory (e.g. malloc) correctly in Method A?

QUESTION 2: Does the syntax look correct for Method B?

QUESTION 3: How do I allocate memory for the arrays in method B?

QUESTION 4: Am I correct that Method B is generally preferred?

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1  
Note: your usage of strncpy() is wrong (but with the literal example it's ok). To safely use strncpy() you should copy 1 less than the size of the destination array and fill the last element with '\0'; otherwise you run the risk of having a char array that is not a string. –  pmg Apr 6 '12 at 21:07
1  
Your code for method A isn't using your storage correctly because your variables are of the wrong type, they needs to be e.g. char (*array_person_name)[100]; and char (*array_param)[2];. –  Neil Apr 6 '12 at 22:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are pretty far off here. 1:yes, 2:no, 3:no, 4:yes. I'm not going to do it all, but here are a few hints.

You need space to store the strings and space to store pointers to the strings (the latter isn't strictly necessary for Method A). The first will have type char*, the second will have type char**.

For Method A, you are allocating the string storage correctly, but you need to allocate the storage for the string pointers correctly (hint: you need arraysize instances of a char* pointer). It then gets initialized to pointers which differ from each other by 100 characters.

For Method B, there is no easy way of allocating space to store the strings, as you don't know how much space you'll need. You could iterate through all the strings once just to count their length, or do one malloc per string, or use a fixed size chunk and allocate more when you run out.

Method B uses the same string storage pointer array as Method A. You need to assign the string pointers into the array once you know where they will go.

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Thanks Keith, regarding For Method A, you are allocating the string storage correctly, but you need to allocate the storage for the string pointers correctly (hint: you need arraysize instances of a char* pointer). It then gets initialized to pointers which differ from each other by 100 characters. Then isn't method B using same storage space as method A (eg. both rectangular arrays)? –  ggkmath Apr 6 '12 at 21:20
    
They both use the same storage for the string pointers, but not for the strings themselves. In other words, both use 4 bytes (or 8 bytes if you're running 64-bit) per string for the string pointer storage. Method A uses an additional 100 bytes per string, while Method B uses only the total length of all the strings (plus one byte per string for the string terminator). –  Keith Randall Apr 6 '12 at 21:22

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