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How would I store and pass the contents of r from main into two? It will print r if I make it r = something fixed, but how do I pass and hold variable contents into r. I tried random.getstate/setstate but it was saying "function object not subscriptable".

import random
from random import randrange

def main():
    r = random.randrange(1,13,1)
    print (r)

r = random.randrange(1,13,1)


def two():
    if r==7 or r==11:
       print (r)
    else:
       print (r)

  main()
  two()
share|improve this question
    
How did you find out about random.getstate? That's totally unrelated. The way you pass information between functions is the same no matter what the functions do, and totally unrelated to the fact that you're using the random module, so I don't understand why you would go digging around in there to find something that might help. These are programming fundamentals that you should be learning first, before trying to work with others' code (by importing modules). Yes, that means writing extremely limited things at first. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 6 '12 at 22:03
    
@KarlKnechtel I actually wrote that code myself, and I am taking a Python programming class right now so I really don't appreciate the assumption that I was taking someone else's code when what I did was look in the python docs. Next time, think before you assume. It is offensive. –  user1316212 Apr 13 '12 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, depending on the situation, you either want to make a class or return the data, then pass it in as an argument, the latter is probably what you want given your code, so, for example:

def main():
  ...
  r = do_something()
  ...
  return r

def two(r):
  ...
  do_something_else(r)
  ...

r = main()
two(r)

If this was happening within something you could define as an entity, you could do it in a class:

class Main():
  def main(self):
    ...
    self.r = do_something()
    ...

  def two(self):
    ...
    do_something_else(self.r)
    ...

main = Main()
main.main()
main.two()

However, in this case, this is unnecessary as you are creating a class that doesn't really encapsulate anything.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help and the comment about classes! –  user1316212 Apr 6 '12 at 21:52
    
No worries, if this answers your question, feel free to accept it. –  Lattyware Apr 6 '12 at 21:57

Use return values and function parameters:

import random
from random import randrange

def main():
    r = random.randrange(1,13,1)
    return r

def two(r):
    if r==7 or r==11:
       print (r)
    else:
       print (r)

r = main()
two(r)

The function main computes the random value and then returns it to the place where it was called. You can then store the return value in a variable (also called r in this case: r = main()). It does not need to be called r though, you can also name it something else.

To pass the value to two, you can pass it as parameter. As you can see in def two(r):, the function two now expects a parameter (also called r) and it is used in that function. Again, this does not need to be called r but it seems fitting to use the same name.

share|improve this answer
    
@lattyware Thanks! It worked great! –  user1316212 Apr 6 '12 at 21:40
    
And thanks for the explanation! –  user1316212 Apr 6 '12 at 21:44

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