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Let's say that I have a code like this:

NSAutoreleasePool* pool=[[NSAutoreleasePool alloc]init];
for(unsigned int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    NSDate* date=[[NSDate alloc]init];
}
[pool drain];

Please note that this code has only the purpose of showing what I could be doing, it's a simplification of what I usually do. So in each iteration a new NSDate is allocated and initialized. Does the NSAutoreleasePool drain them all, or do I have to add the NSAutoreleasePool in the loop this way:

for(unsigned int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    NSAutoreleasePool* pool=[[NSAutoreleasePool alloc]init];
    NSDate* date=[[NSDate alloc]init];
    [pool drain];
}

?
Also, my book (cocoa programming for mac os x) doesn't mention the NSAutoreleasePool, it just use it this way:

@autoreleasepool
{
    <code>
}

I have read that this way is more efficient than using the NSAutoreleasePool, but if I use it I get a syntax error:
"Unexpected '@' in program"
Why this?

I have tried modifying the code this way:

NSAutoreleasePool* pool=[[NSAutoreleasePool alloc]init];
for(unsigned int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    NSDate* date=[[NSDate alloc]init];
    [date autorelease];
}
[pool drain];

Is that correct? I think that 10 different objects are retained (count to 1), then added to the autorelease pool. Am I not having memory leaks? Is there a way to check with gdb this object count?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you alloc/init a class, the returned instance generally will not be autoreleased. So, no, in that example, the autorelease pool isn't needed at all.

In general, you should only sprinkle autorelease pools in your code when you have quantifiable performance problem that indicates that it is needed. Don't fix problems you don't have.

If @autoreleasepool isn't working, it is because you are working with an older compiler.

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1  
The NSDate instance won't itself be autoreleased, but there's no telling what work was done internally with other objects in those two methods. They may have autoreleased things. That said, I agree that that particular example doesn't seem ripe for manual management of autorelease pools, but Ramy did say it was a toy example only for illustration. To answer the question in general, an autorelease pool doesn't help anything until it's drained. So, you have to put a drain in the loop if you want it to prevent the loop from accumulating objects. Also, @Ramy is leaking the NSDate in both cases. –  Ken Thomases Apr 7 '12 at 7:21
    
It's a leak because he uses alloc+init but never releases or autoreleases it. –  Ken Thomases Apr 7 '12 at 20:09
1  
Yeah -- I should know better than to comment on SO before coffee. Herp de derp, "Turn on ARC, man, because the compiler is smarter than you." –  bbum Apr 7 '12 at 20:41
    
Yes, I'll turn on ARC with Mac os X 10.7 ; However I want to know how the release/retain system works.I have tried modifying the code.Do you think it's correct (no leaks) ? –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Apr 8 '12 at 0:24
    
That code won't leak, but there is no reason to use -autorelease instead of -release. –  bbum Apr 8 '12 at 0:30

from apple docs

If you write a loop that creates many temporary objects.
You may use an autorelease pool block inside the loop to dispose of those objects before the next iteration. Using an autorelease pool block in the loop helps to reduce the maximum memory footprint of the application.

so isn't it better if @Ramy uses:

for(unsigned int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    NSAutoreleasePool* pool=[[NSAutoreleasePool alloc]init];
    NSDate* date=[[NSDate alloc]init];
    [date autorelease];
    [pool drain];
}
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