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Given an array like

x = [1, 3, 5, -1, -3, -5]

If we use the command

x.sort {|i| i}

We are given

x = [-1, -3, -5, 1, 3, 5]

Is there any way, given our array, to have it return it in proper ascending/descending order with negatives? E.g.

x = [-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5] or [5, 3, 1, -1, -3, -5]

EDIT:

It seems like x.sort would solve this problem, but if there was a more sophisticated problem in which I want to sort from my array based on values given in a hash e.g.

x = [{:i=>1}, {:i=>2}, {:i=>3}, {:i=>4}, {:i=>5}]
y = {3=>10, 4=>-1, 2=>-2, 5=>-3, 1=>-4}

I want to be able to sort x based on the values in y so that my result is

x = [{:i=>3}, {:i=>4}, {:i=>2}, {:i=>5}, {:i=>1}]
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You mean x.sort? –  maerics Apr 6 '12 at 21:54
    
oh.. how did i miss that?! can anybody explain why x.sort {|i| i} gives that behavior? I would've expected it to be the same –  Ken Apr 6 '12 at 21:57
    
i ask this because I actually want to sort by values given from a hash, so i would like to call something similar to x.sort {|i| hash[:i]}, where my values from hash[:i] have values such as (-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, etc) –  Ken Apr 6 '12 at 21:58
    
Added a simper answer for your second question using sort_by. –  Michael Kohl Apr 6 '12 at 22:56
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
x = [1, 3, 5, -1, -3, -5]
x.sort # => [-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5]
x.sort {|a,b| a <=> b} # => [-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5]
x.sort {|a,b| b <=> a} # => [5, 3, 1, -1, -3, -5]

Your example yields unexpected results because of the return value expected by the Array#sort method. Basically, when you return just the first argument (when two are expected), the interpreter only looks at the sign (-/0/+) of the element and uses that for ordering. So depending on the underlying sort algorithm, when it yields pairs from the array to your block it's only looking at the sign of the first element, so something like:

compare(1, 3) # => 1 (wrong, should be -1 since 1 < 3)
compare(1, 5) # => 1 (wrong, should be -1 since 1 < 5)
compare(1, -1) # => 1 (right, by complete accident)

[Edit] Per your updated question, try using the following sort comparator block:

x.sort! {|a,b| y[b[:i]] <=> y[a[:i]]}
x # => [{:i=>3}, {:i=>4}, {:i=>2}, {:i=>5}, {:i=>1}]

Which reads - sort the array x in place by comparing each element pair, a and b, by looking up their :i attribute in the hash y and comparing those values in descending order.

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sorry you're right, but my real question in which I'm stuck on has been updated in my OP –  Ken Apr 6 '12 at 22:03
    
thanks for an explanation! i guess there's no better way to do it than the one you suggested. from my understanding the use of "x.sort {|a,b| a <=> b}" is slower than just "x.sort" –  Ken Apr 6 '12 at 22:21
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I'm surprised no one mentioned Enumerable#sort_by so far. While for your original question sort is obviously the right answer, sort_by would have worked with the block as you expected. Also your updated question is easy to solve with it:

x = [-1, -3, -5, 1, 3, 5]
x.sort_by { |i| i } 
#=> [-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5]

x = [{:i=>1}, {:i=>2}, {:i=>3}, {:i=>4}, {:i=>5}]
y = {3=>10, 4=>-1, 2=>-2, 5=>-3, 1=>-4}
x.sort_by { |x| -y[x[:i]] } 
#=> [{:i=>3}, {:i=>4}, {:i=>2}, {:i=>5}, {:i=>1}]
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x.sort # => [-5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5] 
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sorry you're right, but my real question in which I'm stuck on has been updated in my OP –  Ken Apr 6 '12 at 22:02
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