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Basic question!

I have 2 tables

PRODUCE

   +-----+--------------+  
   | id  |  fruit_name  |
   +--------------------+
   | 1   |   Apple      |
   | 2   |   Banana     |
   | 3   |   Carrot     |
   +-----+--------------+

VARIETIES

   +-----+---------------+----------------+
   | id  |  fk_fruit_id  |  variety_name  |
   +-----+---------------+----------------+
   | 1   |   1           |    Cox         |
   | 2   |   1           |    Braeburn    |
   | 3   |   2           |    Chester     |
   | 4   |   3           |    Kotaka      |
   | 5   |   3           |    Imperial    |
   | 6   |   3           |    Oneal       |
   +-----+---------------+----------------+

I'd like to output a list of varieties per fruit e.g.

APPLE - Cox, Braeburn

BANANA - Chester

CARROT - Kotaka, Imperial, Oneal

My current code is

$query   = "SELECT * FROM produce, varieties WHERE produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id"; 

$result  = mysql_query($query) or die('Error : ' . mysql_error()); 
while ($row     = mysql_fetch_array($result, MYSQL_ASSOC)) { 

$produce_fruit_code   = $row['fruit_code']; 
$variety_name   = $row['variety_name']; 

echo $produce_fruit_code.' - '.$variety_name.'<br/>';

}

which outputs:

Apple - Cox
Apple - Braeburn
Banana - Chester
Carrot - Kotaka
Carrot - Imperial
Carrot - Oneal

Not a million miles away, but still not there. Any help is much appreciated, thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
i would be able to help you better if I'd grown up in a society that embraced grown food... i've never heard of any of those varieties. :/ –  Kristian Apr 6 '12 at 23:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This won't get you all the way, but it will get you most of what you want. There are some edge cases that are problematic.

$query   = "SELECT * FROM produce, varieties WHERE produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id"; 
$result  = mysql_query($query) or die('Error : ' . mysql_error()); 

$produce_fruit_code = "";
while ($row     = mysql_fetch_array($result, MYSQL_ASSOC)) { 
  if ($produce_fruit_code != $row['fruit_code'])
  {
    $produce_fruit_code = $row['fruit_code'];
    echo "<br/>".$produce_fruit_code." - ". $row['variety_name'];
  } else {
    echo ", ".$row['variety_name']; 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
$current_produce is never set or updated... –  zaf Apr 6 '12 at 23:21
    
Sorry about that... typo when I revised it. –  Nathaniel Ford Apr 6 '12 at 23:23
    
Does the job! Many thanks Nathaniel. –  TRH88 Apr 7 '12 at 8:19

You probably could get one chunky sql statement to do that for you but I'd opt for data juggling with arrays.

For example (not tested and excuse the formatting):

$query   = "SELECT * FROM produce, varieties WHERE produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id";     
$result  = mysql_query($query) or die('Error : ' . mysql_error()); 

$res=array();

while ($row     = mysql_fetch_array($result, MYSQL_ASSOC)) { 

    $produce_fruit_code   = $row['fruit_code']; 
    $variety_name   = $row['variety_name']; 

    if(isset($res[$produce_fruit_code])){
        $res[$produce_fruit_code]+=','.$variety_name;
    }else{
        $res[$produce_fruit_code]=$variety_name;
    }

}        
print_r($res);
share|improve this answer
    
The downside to this is that there will be a preceding comma for each variety, no trailing dash for each fruit, and includes no html formatting, which was indicated in the original post. print_r is a cleaner way to go about it, though, if it's for programmatic parsing. –  Nathaniel Ford Apr 6 '12 at 23:58

If you are using MySQL you can use the group_concat extension on grouping. Something along the lines of:

SELECT 
   f.fruitname as fruit, 
   GROUP_CONCAT(distinct v.varietyname separator ',') as variety  
FROM fruit f JOIN varieties v ON produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id;

or similar. Sorry my sql is a little rusty quite now. For more look at this article http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2006/09/04/group_concat-useful-group-by-extension/ and of course here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-functions.html

If you dont work with MySQL and your database doesn't support group_concat think about buffering those results. In large databases and with many simultaneous users your application can considerably slow down when having to download all data and store it in locally every time.

share|improve this answer
    
You're missing the group by f.id, f.fruitname, although the second one can be ommited in mysql –  Mosty Mostacho Apr 7 '12 at 2:12
$query   = "SELECT * FROM produce, varieties WHERE produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id"; 

echo "<dl>";

$result  = mysql_query($query) or die('Error : ' . mysql_error()); 
while ($row     = mysql_fetch_array($result, MYSQL_ASSOC)) { 

    if($row['fruit_name'] != $current_fruit_name) {
        $current_fruit_name = $row['fruit_name'];
        echo "<dt>$current_fruit_name</dt>"; 
     }
echo "<dd>" . $row['variety_name'] . "</dd>";

}

    echo "";

If you want some CSS that will make a definition list look like the Name - X,Y,Z like in the question, let me know.

share|improve this answer

You can query this directly

SELECT 
   f.fruitname as fruit, 
   GROUP_CONCAT(distinct v.varietyname separator ',') as variety  
FROM fruit f JOIN varieties v ON produce.id = varieties.fk_fruit_id;
GROUP BY produce.id
share|improve this answer

Sort everything into arrays in your while loop. This should work:

while ($row = mysql_fetch_array($result, MYSQL_ASSOC)) { 

   $produce_fruit_code   = $row['fruit_code']; 
   $variety_name   = $row['variety_name']; 

   if ($produce_fruit_code == "Apple") {
   $apple_array[] = $variety_name;
   }
   if ($produce_fruit_code == "Banana") {
   $banana_array[] = $variety_name;
   }
   if ($produce_fruit_code == "Carrot") {
   $carrot_array[] = $variety_name;
   }

}

echo "Apples:" . implode(", ", $apple_array) . "<br/>";
echo "Bananas:" . implode(", ", $bananas_array) . "<br/>";
echo "Carrots:" . implode(", ", $carrots_array) . "<br/>";
share|improve this answer
1  
So what happens when another item is inserted into the database? Like an orange? –  zaf Apr 6 '12 at 23:20
    
@zaf He'd update his code? –  Norse Apr 6 '12 at 23:21
    
You're more than welcome to work out the OP's entire project for him :) –  Norse Apr 6 '12 at 23:23
1  
This is not a good response. You do not want to update your code every time you add an item to your database. It should work with arbitrary items in the table. –  Nathaniel Ford Apr 6 '12 at 23:24
    
@NathanielFord I'm working blind here. I don't know what the OPs system/database setup is like. My answer is a simple solution to his question. It wouldn't be hard to add three lines of code for a new fruit. –  Norse Apr 6 '12 at 23:26

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