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I am trying to read a large text file (4000+ lines) and output each line to console. I am using the following code

        using (var reader = new StreamReader("list1.txt"))
        {
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
                Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadLine().Trim());
        }

        Console.Read();

This reads the lines, but the problem is the reading starts from line 4113 when it should be starting from line one correct? So that means I am only get 100 or so of the lines from the text file. Why would this be occuring?

Thanks.

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6  
This looks like it should work. Are you sure that it's not just scrolling past the scrollbuffer of the console window? –  Robaticus Apr 7 '12 at 0:51
    
How would I check that? –  Duncan Palmer Apr 7 '12 at 0:53
    
Ah yes, I changed the bufferheight to suite the lines of text.. Works now thanks :) –  Duncan Palmer Apr 7 '12 at 0:55

2 Answers 2

As suggested by a user I needed to increase Bufferheight to acomodate the lines of text.

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You may well find that the output window only shows you the last N lines, where N is around 100. In other words, the scrollback buffer is smaller than you think.

You can check this by changing your code to something like:

int numlines = 0;
using (var reader = new StreamReader("list1.txt")) {
    while (!reader.EndOfStream) {
        Console.WriteLine(reader.ReadLine().Trim());
        numlines++;
    }
}
Console.WriteLine("Wrote " + numlines + " lines.");
Console.Read();

which will output the number of lines processed at the end.

You can change the console height with a command like:

Console.BufferHeight = 30000;
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