Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I compile my program, I get three "undefined reference to 'PrintArgv(...)'" errors. I have searched but I cannot find the reason why I am getting these errors. Here is my code:

    #include "tools.hpp"

enum ARG_T {COMMAND, SWITCH, ARGUMENT};
void ReadArgs(int, char**, ofstream&);
void PrintArgv(char*, ARG_T, ofstream&);


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    ofstream fout;
    try{
        fout.open("P1Ford.txt", ios::out | ios::app);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        //fatal("Could not open file P1Ford.txt");
        cout << "Could not open file P1Ford.txt" << "\n";
        return -1;
    }

    ReadArgs(argc, argv, fout);

    fout.close();
    return 0;
}

/*-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
This function takes the values passed in through the command line
then examines each one to determine if it is the command, a switch or
an argument. Then passes it to a function to print it to the file.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
void ReadArgs(int argc, char* argv[], ofstream& fout)
{
    for(int c=0; c<argc; ++c)
    {
        if(c == 0) PrintArgv(argv[c], COMMAND, fout);
        else if(strncmp(argv[c], "-", 1) == 0) PrintArgv(argv[c], SWITCH, fout);
        else if(strncmp(argv[c], ">", 1) == 0) ;
        else PrintArgv(argv[c], ARGUMENT, fout);
    }
}

/*-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
This function prints the argument in the correct format
Command <command>
   Switch <switch>
   Argument <agrument>
   Argument <argument>
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
void PrintArgv(char* val, ARG_T type, ostream& fout)
{
    if(type == COMMAND) fout << "Command " << val << "\n";
    if(type == SWITCH) fout << "\t" << "Switch " << val << "\n";
    if(type == ARGUMENT) fout << "\t" << "Argument " << val << "\n";
}

The function ReadArgs is where I am getting the errors. Each call to PrintArgv gives me the error. I am using G++ 4.6.1.

share|improve this question
    
Can you construct a much shorter test-case? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 7 '12 at 1:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your prototype has a parameter of type ofstream & and your header has one of type ostream &. This means that the implementation of PrintArgv is actually declaring a new function. You call the one you specified a prototype for, though, which has no body because you inadvertently created a new function instead of defining the body of the original one.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thank you. I checked the prototype and the call but did not double check the function itself. –  DFord Apr 7 '12 at 1:43
    
Just remember that the error you're getting occurs when a function is declared, but has no executable body that the linker can find. This will definitely help debugging future code. –  chris Apr 7 '12 at 1:45
    
thanks, i will keep that in mind. –  DFord Apr 7 '12 at 1:49

Replace your function definition at the top by the arguments in fact used:

#include "tools.hpp"

enum ARG_T {COMMAND, SWITCH, ARGUMENT};

void ReadArgs(int argc, char* argv[], ofstream& fout)
void PrintArgv(char* val, ARG_T type, ostream& fout)
share|improve this answer
    
On the surface this looks like he's suggesting adding the named parameters instead of just the types. But it looks like he did catch the ofstream/ostream difference in the PrintArgv() proto. +1 –  Amardeep Apr 7 '12 at 1:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.