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I want to avoid code duplication as much as possible. Suppose I have a class such as,

class T {
    int val;
    bool operator < (const T& right) const { return val < right.val; }
}

I want to be able to call std::sort() like this,

std::sort( SomeContainer.begin(), SomeContainer.end(), FuncAdaptedFromOp );

This is my very first question in StackOverflow. Please be forgiving.

EDIT

The problem is that the class may have multiple bool T::Compare (const T& right) functions. I would still like an adapter. Take this example,

class Edge {
    Vertex u, v;
    bool CompareSrc (const Edge& right) const { return u < right.u; }
    bool CompareDest (const Edge& right) const { return v < right.v; }
}

Sometimes I want to sort by source Vertex and sometimes by destination Vertex. I just want to know if this is possible or not.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
using namespace std::placeholders;
std::sort(SomeContainer.begin(), SomeContainer.end()
    // or use &Edge::CompareDest if you want that instead
    , std::bind(&Edge::CompareSrc, _1, _2) );

std::bind is C++11 though, so you may want to use boost::bind (in which case you shouldn't use the preceding using directive) or the bind from TR1 if your implementation has that. Otherwise I'd advise you to handroll your own functor.

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Thank you. This is exactly what I wanted. –  Hindol Apr 8 '12 at 11:51

If you don't provide a third parameter, then the < operator will be used.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/sort/

"The elements are compared using operator< for the first version, and comp for the second."

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You just duplicate STL functor std::less http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/functional/less/

template <class T> struct less : binary_function <T,T,bool> {
  bool operator() (const T& x, const T& y) const
    {return x<y;}
};

Example with less:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>

struct my_struct {
   int a;
   bool operator< (const my_struct &s) const {
      return a < s.a;
   }
};

int main() {
   my_struct array[10];

   for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
      array[i].a = 10 - i;

   std::sort(array, array + 10, std::less<my_struct>());

   for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
      std::cout << array[i].a << ", ";
}

You don't need to write it. Algorithm std::sort has two versions:

template <class RandomAccessIterator>
  void sort ( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last );

template <class RandomAccessIterator, class Compare>
  void sort ( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last, Compare comp );

First version may be used when your class provides operator < (is comparable). Second version is used if you don't want use operator < or it doesn't exist.

Example without less:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>

struct my_struct {
   int a;
   bool operator< (const my_struct &s) const {
      return a < s.a;
   }
};

int main() {
   my_struct array[10];

   for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
      array[i].a = 10 - i;

   std::sort(array, array + 10);

   for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
      std::cout << array[i].a << ", ";
}

The examples have the same result.

Also you can use others functors to change behavior of sort algorithms such as std::greater.

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Not exactly what I wanted. I am sorry my question was not clear enough earlier. –  Hindol Apr 7 '12 at 8:05

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