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Hi I have the need to calculate the distance between two points having the lat and long.

I would like to avoid any call to external API.

I tried to implement the Haversine Formula in PHP:

Here is the code:

class CoordDistance
 {
    public $lat_a = 0;
    public $lon_a = 0;
    public $lat_b = 0;
    public $lon_b = 0;

    public $measure_unit = 'kilometers';

    public $measure_state = false;

    public $measure = 0;

    public $error = '';



    public function DistAB()

      {
          $delta_lat = $this->lat_b - $this->lat_a ;
          $delta_lon = $this->lon_b - $this->lon_a ;

          $earth_radius = 6372.795477598;

          $alpha    = $delta_lat/2;
          $beta     = $delta_lon/2;
          $a        = sin(deg2rad($alpha)) * sin(deg2rad($alpha)) + cos(deg2rad($this->lat_a)) * cos(deg2rad($this->lat_b)) * sin(deg2rad($beta)) * sin(deg2rad($beta)) ;
          $c        = asin(min(1, sqrt($a)));
          $distance = 2*$earth_radius * $c;
          $distance = round($distance, 4);

          $this->measure = $distance;

      }
    }

Testing it with some given points which have public distances I don't get a reliable result.

I don't understand if there is an error in the original formula or in my implementation

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how exact do you need it? –  Kerwindena Apr 7 '12 at 10:20
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4 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Not long ago i wrote an example of the haversine formula, and published it on my website:

/**
 * Calculates the great-circle distance between two points, with
 * the Haversine formula.
 * @param float $latitudeFrom Latitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeFrom Longitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $latitudeTo Latitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeTo Longitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $earthRadius Mean earth radius in [m]
 * @return float Distance between points in [m] (same as earthRadius)
 */
function haversineGreatCircleDistance(
  $latitudeFrom, $longitudeFrom, $latitudeTo, $longitudeTo, $earthRadius = 6371000)
{
  // convert from degrees to radians
  $latFrom = deg2rad($latitudeFrom);
  $lonFrom = deg2rad($longitudeFrom);
  $latTo = deg2rad($latitudeTo);
  $lonTo = deg2rad($longitudeTo);

  $latDelta = $latTo - $latFrom;
  $lonDelta = $lonTo - $lonFrom;

  $angle = 2 * asin(sqrt(pow(sin($latDelta / 2), 2) +
    cos($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * pow(sin($lonDelta / 2), 2)));
  return $angle * $earthRadius;
}

Edit:

As TreyA correctly pointed out, the Haversine formula has weaknesses with antipodal points because of rounding errors (though it is stable for small distances). To get around them, you could use the Vincenty formula instead.

/**
 * Calculates the great-circle distance between two points, with
 * the Vincenty formula.
 * @param float $latitudeFrom Latitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeFrom Longitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $latitudeTo Latitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeTo Longitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $earthRadius Mean earth radius in [m]
 * @return float Distance between points in [m] (same as earthRadius)
 */
public static function vincentyGreatCircleDistance(
  $latitudeFrom, $longitudeFrom, $latitudeTo, $longitudeTo, $earthRadius = 6371000)
{
  // convert from degrees to radians
  $latFrom = deg2rad($latitudeFrom);
  $lonFrom = deg2rad($longitudeFrom);
  $latTo = deg2rad($latitudeTo);
  $lonTo = deg2rad($longitudeTo);

  $lonDelta = $lonTo - $lonFrom;
  $a = pow(cos($latTo) * sin($lonDelta), 2) +
    pow(cos($latFrom) * sin($latTo) - sin($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * cos($lonDelta), 2);
  $b = sin($latFrom) * sin($latTo) + cos($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * cos($lonDelta);

  $angle = atan2(sqrt($a), $b);
  return $angle * $earthRadius;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@TreyA - There are different versions possible, this version implements the formula in Wikipedia and is well tested. The $angle means the angle in the middle of the world in radians, so one can multiplicate it with the earth radius. I can also provide an example of the more complex Vincenty formula if someone is interested. –  martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 7:43
    
@TreyA - Yes i know, i'm not sure what you want to say with that. Have you tested the function and did it calculate a wrong result? And have you looked at the formula in Wikipedia? You should really do a test of your own and give me an example of what you think is calculated wrong. –  martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 14:49
    
Sorry, but i have to explain some things now. 1) The question was about the Haversine formula, you should tell us if you suggest to use another formula. 2) The Haversine formula has weaknesses around the poles, but is accurate for small distances (it's a problem of the arccosine formula). 3) You stated that there is a step missing with the calculated $angle, that's simply wrong, it cannot improve the result, please please test it out! 4) I agree that it would be better to use the stable Vincenty formula, i already offered to give an example. Maybe you could write an answer as well? –  martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 18:00
    
@TreyA - I added an example of the Vincenty formula, maybe you want to have a look at it. –  martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 19:05
    
@martinstoekli - you are correct, you do not have a step missing in your Haversine formula. I removed my comments as to not confuse future readers. –  TreyA May 2 '12 at 12:34
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I have written a simple PHP library for this very sort of problem.

Navigator can calculate the distance between two coordinates with the following formulae:

  • Great Circle
  • Haversine
  • Cosine Law
  • Vincenty's Formula (the most accurate)
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For exact values do it like that:

public function DistAB()
{
      $delta_lat = $this->lat_b - $this->lat_a ;
      $delta_lon = $this->lon_b - $this->lon_a ;

      $a = pow(sin($delta_lat/2), 2);
      $a += cos(deg2rad($this->lat_a9)) * cos(deg2rad($this->lat_b9)) * pow(sin(deg2rad($delta_lon/29)), 2);
      $c = 2 * atan2(sqrt($a), sqrt(1-$a));

      $distance = 2 * $earth_radius * $c;
      $distance = round($distance, 4);

      $this->measure = $distance;
}

Hmm I think that should do it...

Edit:

For formulars and at least JS-implementations try: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html

Dare me... I forgot to deg2rad all the values in the circle-functions...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I've checked this implementation with a simple calculation between pointA(42,12) and pointB(43,12) using $earth_radius = 6372.795477598 I get as result 12745.591 when it should be something around 110,94 –  maxdangelo Apr 7 '12 at 16:33
    
@maxdangelo Ohh sorry, I corrected the code.. –  Kerwindena Apr 7 '12 at 18:52
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The multiplier is changed at every coordinate because of the great circle distance theory as written here :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance

and you can calculate the nearest value using this formula described here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance#Worked_example

the key is converting each degree - minute - second value to all degree value:

N 36°7.2', W 86°40.2'  N = (+) , W = (-), S = (-), E = (+) 
referencing the Greenwich meridian and Equator parallel

(phi)     36.12° = 36° + 7.2'/60' 

(lambda)  -86.67° = 86° + 40.2'/60'
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