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I was reviewing the following code in a linux kernel module :

static int proc_read_kernel(char *buffer, char **start, off_t offset, int length,int *eof, void *data)
 {
   int len=0;
   struct mem_rw_t *mem= (struct mem_rw_t *)data;

   switch(mem->flag)
   {

From the above code it swiches to another function which has a length check as follows

static int func1(char *buffer, char **start, off_t offset, int length)
{
    printk ("The value for len is %d\n\r",len);
    printk ("The value for length is %d\n\r",length);

    if(len > length)
         goto list_finished;

The output of the above code looks as below. It looks like the len is going greater than length for the last value and proc read is not working properly:

The value for len is 0
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 398
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 796
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 796
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 1537
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 1777
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 1777
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 2029
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 2427
The value for length is 3072
The value for len is 3120
The value for length is 3072
<4>proc_file_read: Read count exceeded

Any suggestions to remove the above error ?

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What are len and length? Where do you get them from? func1 doesn't have a variable named len. –  ugoren Apr 8 '12 at 10:21
    
length is what we pass to proc_read and the len (which is calculated internally) is the total length of data to be read using the PROC interface which goes beyond the PROC_BLOCK_SIZE (3072) as per the prints ; code in proc/base.c says last 1K is reserved for Kernel . Can this be resolved (meaning make proc read more than 3K) with existing PROC infrastructure itself ? Thanks. –  lxusr Apr 9 '12 at 5:16
    
The question just isn't clear. The code sample should be more complete, and the question should be more accurate. Your comment explains some things, but it would be much better to edit the question. –  ugoren Apr 9 '12 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

Based on what your comment says, I suggest that you look at linux/seq_file.h.
The APIs it exports allow you to create a multi-line /proc entry, which isn't limited in size.
You'll need to provide a function that returns one line of data, and it would be called repeatedly by the I/S, with a new buffer each time. If each line doesn't exceed 3K (and it would be horribly unreadable if it does), it should be OK.

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