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I have this as a homework and i need to do it in python.

Problem:
The Maximum Route is defined as the maximum total by traversing from the tip of the triangle to its base. Here the maximum route is (3+7+4+9) 23.

3
7 4
2 4 6
8 5 9 3

Now, given a certain triangle, my task is to find the Maximum Route for it. 

Not sure how to do it....

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closed as not a real question by Jacob, SingerOfTheFall, hochl, Leigh, gauden Sep 26 '12 at 12:45

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Nvm alright.... –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 10:29
    
nah i figured it has to be within one number radius from the example, i should have read it first but forgot to scroll to the side -_- –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 10:32
    
I recognize this... projecteuler.net/problem=18 –  Kendall Frey Apr 7 '12 at 14:03
    
@KendallFrey: This is different from Euler 18 –  Abhijit Apr 7 '12 at 15:40
    
@Abhijit: What makes you say that? The example triangle is the same. I don't see anything that suggests this is different. –  Kendall Frey Apr 7 '12 at 15:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We can solve this problem using backtracking. To do that for each element of the triangle in any given row, we have to determine the maximum of sum of the current element and the three connected neighbors in the next row, or

if elem = triangle[row][col] and the next row is triangle[row+1]

then backtrack_elem = max([elem + i for i in connected_neighbors of col in row])

First try to find a way to determine connected_neighbors of col in row

for an elem in position (row,col), connected neighbor in row = next would be [next[col-1],next[col],next[col+1]] provided col - 1 >=0 and col+1 < len(next). Here is am sample implementation

>>> def neigh(n,sz):
    return [i for i in (n-1,n,n+1) if 0<=i<sz]

This will return the index of the connected neighbors.

now we can write backtrack_elem = max([elem + i for i in connected_neighbors of col in row]) as

triangle[row][i] = max([elem + next[n] for n in neigh(i,len(next))])

and if we iterate the triangle rowwise and curr is any given row then and i is the ith col index of the row then we can write

curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))

now we have to iterate the triangle reading the current and the next row together. This can be done as

for (curr,next) in zip(triangle[-2::-1],triangle[::-1]):

and then we use enumerate to generate a tuple of index and the elem itself

for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):

Clubbing then together we have

>>> for (curr,next) in zip(triangle[-2::-1],triangle[::-1]):
    for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):
        curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))

But the above operation is destructive and we have to create a copy of the original triangle and work on it

route = triangle # This will not work, because in python copy is done by reference
route = triangle[:] #This will also not work, because triangle is a list of list
                    #and individual list would be copied with reference

So we have to use the deepcopy module

import copy
route = copy.deepcopy(triangle) #This will work

and rewrite out traverse as

>>> for (curr,next) in zip(route[-2::-1],route[::-1]):
    for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):
        curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))

We end up with another triangle where every elem gives the highest route cost possible. To get the actual route, we have to use the original triangle and calculate backward

so for an elem at index [row,col], the highest route cost is route[row][col]. If it follows the max route, then the next elem should be a connected neighbor and the route cost should be route[row][col] - orig[row][col]. If we iterate row wise we can write as

i=[x for x in neigh(next,i) if x == curr[i]-orig[i]][0]
orig[i]

and we should loop downwards starting from the peak element. Thus we have

>>> for (curr,next,orig) in zip(route,route[1:],triangle):
    print orig[i],
    i=[x for x in neigh(i,len(next)) if next[x] == curr[i]-orig[i]][0]

Lets take a bit complex example, as yours is too trivial to solve

>>> triangle=[
          [3],
          [7, 4],
          [2, 4, 6],
          [8, 5, 9, 3],
          [15,10,2, 7, 8]
         ]

>>> route=copy.deepcopy(triangle) # Create a Copy

Generating the Route

>>> for (curr,next) in zip(route[-2::-1],route[::-1]):
    for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):
        curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))


>>> route
[[37], [34, 31], [25, 27, 26], [23, 20, 19, 11], [15, 10, 2, 7, 8]]

and finally we calculate the route

>>> def enroute(triangle):
    route=copy.deepcopy(triangle) # Create a Copy
    # Generating the Route
    for (curr,next) in zip(route[-2::-1],route[::-1]): #Read the curr and next row
        for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):
            #Backtrack calculation
            curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))
    path=[] #Start with the peak elem
    for (curr,next,orig) in zip(route,route[1:],triangle): #Read the curr, next and orig row
        path.append(orig[i])
        i=[x for x in neigh(i,len(next)) if next[x] == curr[i]-orig[i]][0]
    path.append(triangle[-1][i]) #Don't forget the last row which
    return (route[0],path)

To Test our triangle we have

>>> enroute(triangle)
([37], [3, 7, 4, 8, 15])

Reading a comment by jamylak, I realized this problem is similar to Euler 18 but the difference is the representation. The problem in Euler 18 considers a pyramid where as the problem in this question is of a right angle triangle. As you can read my reply to his comment I explained the reason why the results would be different. Nevertheless, this problem can be easily ported to work with Euler 18. Here is the port

>>> def enroute(triangle,neigh=lambda n,sz:[i for i in (n-1,n,n+1) if 0<=i<sz]):
    route=copy.deepcopy(triangle) # Create a Copy
    # Generating the Route
    for (curr,next) in zip(route[-2::-1],route[::-1]): #Read the curr and next row
        for (i,e) in enumerate(curr):
            #Backtrack calculation
            curr[i]=max(next[n]+e for n in neigh(i,len(next)))
    path=[] #Start with the peak elem
    for (curr,next,orig) in zip(route,route[1:],triangle): #Read the curr, next and orig row
        path.append(orig[i])
        i=[x for x in neigh(i,len(next)) if next[x] == curr[i]-orig[i]][0]
    path.append(triangle[-1][i]) #Don't forget the last row which
    return (route[0],path)

>>> enroute(t1) # For Right angle triangle
([1116], [75, 64, 82, 87, 82, 75, 77, 65, 41, 72, 71, 70, 91, 66, 98])
>>> enroute(t1,neigh=lambda n,sz:[i for i in (n,n+1) if i<sz]) # For a Pyramid
([1074], [75, 64, 82, 87, 82, 75, 73, 28, 83, 32, 91, 78, 58, 73, 93])
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
Note: Currently your codeonly works on smaller triangles. Test it on Euler problem 18 triangle. I had the same problem but fixed the possible paths. It produces 1116 instead of 1074 –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 15:01
    
@jamylak: And you can see why there is a mismatch. The problem in this example is for a right angle triangle and that of Euler 18 is a Pyramid. A pyramid has two neighbor where as a right triangle has 3. For A Triangle, the neighbor for '75' which is at row 6, index 4 has three neighbor {77,73,7} where as in the pyramid it has two {73,07}. This answer can easily be ported for Euler 18 by changing the function neigh –  Abhijit Apr 7 '12 at 15:28
    
I was under the impression that it was the same, as it is exactly the same example... I'm just going to leave my 'pyramid' code then... –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 15:35
    
@jamylak: See my update in the answer. This will also work for pyramid with a little tweak. Also I will add a comment to your answer so people reading it might realize that this will not work for the OPs question. –  Abhijit Apr 7 '12 at 15:39
    
It does work for his question though and I already added a comment :D –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 15:40

Even though this is homework, @abhijit gave an answer so i will too!

To understand this you will need to read up on python generators, might need to google it ;)

>>> triangle=[
          [3],
          [7, 4],
          [2, 4, 6],
          [8, 5, 9, 3]
         ]

The first step is to find all possible routes

>>> def routes(rows,current_row=0,start=0): 
        for i,num in enumerate(rows[current_row]): #gets the index and number of each number in the row
            if abs(i-start) > 1:   # Checks if it is within 1 number radius, if not it skips this one. Use if not (0 <= (i-start) < 2) to check in pyramid
                continue
            if current_row == len(rows) - 1: # We are iterating through the last row so simply yield the number as it has no children
                yield [num]
            else:
                for child in routes(rows,current_row+1,i): #This is not the last row so get all children of this number and yield them
                    yield [num] + child

This gives

>>> list(routes(triangle))
[[3, 7, 2, 8], [3, 7, 2, 5], [3, 7, 4, 8], [3, 7, 4, 5], [3, 7, 4, 9], [3, 4, 2, 8], [3, 4, 2, 5], [3, 4, 4, 8], [3, 4, 4, 5], [3, 4, 4, 9], [3, 4, 6, 5], [3, 4, 6, 9], [3, 4, 6, 3]]

To get the max is simple now, max accepts generators as they are iterables so we don't need to convert it into a list.

>>> max(routes(triangle),key=sum)
[3, 7, 4, 9]
share|improve this answer
    
I like the way you used the generator for this purpose. But isn't this have O(n^2) complexity? –  Abhijit Apr 7 '12 at 14:10
    
Probably but my solution was more for simplicity to help him understand how to do it, i didn't have speed in mind. I will look through your one now to see how to do it faster :D –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 14:12
    
This will not work for OPs Question. See the discussion below my answer –  Abhijit Apr 7 '12 at 15:40
    
Nvm i reverted it, now it just works as it did before so it does work for the OP's question, better leave it like that ;) –  jamylak Apr 7 '12 at 15:44

I will give you some hints on this specific case. Try to create a generalized function for a n-floors triangle yourself.

triangle=[
          [3],
          [7, 4],
          [2, 4, 6],
          [8, 5, 9, 3]
         ]

possible_roads={}

for i1 in range(1):
    for i2 in range(max(i1-1,0),i1+2):
        for i3 in range(max(i2-1,0),i2+2):
            for i4 in range(max(i3-1,0),i3+2):
                road=(triangle[0][i1],triangle[1][i2],triangle[2][i3],triangle[3][i4])
                possible_roads[road]=sum(road)

print "Best road: %s (sum: %s)" % (max(possible_roads), possible_roads[max(possible_roads)])

[EDIT] Since everyone posted their answers here is mine.

triangle=[
          [3],
          [7, 4],
          [2, 4, 6],
          [8, 5, 9, 3]
         ]

def generate_backtrack(triangle):
    n=len(triangle)
    routes=[[{'pos':i,'val':triangle[n-1][i]}] for i in range(n)]
    while n!=1:
        base_routes=[]
        for idx in range(len(routes)):
            i=routes[idx][-1]['pos'] #last node
            movements=range(
                                max(0,i-1),
                                min(i+2,n-1)
                            )
            for movement in movements:
                base_routes.append(routes[idx]+[{'pos':movement,'val':triangle[n-2][movement]}])

        n-=1
        routes=base_routes
    return [[k['val'] for k in j] for j in routes]

print sorted(generate_backtrack(triangle),key=sum,reverse=True)[0][::-1]
share|improve this answer

My answer

def maxpath(listN):
  liv = len(listN) -1
  return calcl(listN,liv)

def calcl(listN,liv):
  if liv == 0:
    return listN[0]
  listN[liv-1] = [(listN[liv-1][i]+listN[liv][i+1],listN[liv-1][i]+listN[liv][i]) \
            [ listN[liv][i] > listN[liv][i+1] ] for i in range(0,liv)]
  return calcl(listN,liv-1)

output

l5=[
      [3],
      [7, 4],
      [2, 4, 6],
      [8, 5, 9, 3],
      [15,10,2, 7, 8]
     ]
print(maxpath(l5)
>>>[35]
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer seems to be wrong... The value of max path should be 33 right? –  lakesh Sep 14 '12 at 1:30
    
it is wrong just because I had another level [15,10,2, 7, 8], if you use your input is correct –  fege May 24 '13 at 17:26

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