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I have started an open source project a few days ago, it's licensed under BSD 3 clause license and written in Python.

I am not clear on when and how I need to maintain my LICENSE and AUTHORS files.

Currently, my LICENSE file contains BSD 3-clause with the phrasing is Copyright (c) <my name> and I have no AUTHORS file (as I am the sole developer at the moment).

Now, I have a few questions:

  1. How do I change LICENSE file (again, BSD 3 clause) when I have multiple developers? What line(s) do I need to add/modify/remove?

  2. If someone contributes a single line to my project, does it mean he needs to be added to LICENSE? To AUTHORS file(s)?

  3. If someone contributes a code, but I re-write it (completely, or partly), do I need to add him to LICENSE? To AUTHORS file(s)?

  4. If someone contributes a document / suggest a feature and I accept it, do I need to add him to the LICENSE? to AUTHORS file(s)?

  5. If someone suggest a bug fix (without submitting code), do I need to add him LICENSE and/or AUTHORS file(s)?

  6. My project is in Python, in BSD license, do I need to include it in every Python file header, or just having a LICENSE file in root directory of the project is enough? (I'm asking copyright-wise, not style-wise).

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closed as off-topic by JasonMArcher, rene, Jeffrey Bosboom, victorkohl, Andrew Medico Jun 1 at 0:55

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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is a licensing question. –  JasonMArcher May 31 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

The following are just personal recommendations, if you're concerned about legal safety contact a lawyer on your behalf:

1. How do I change LICENSE file (again, BSD 3 clause) when I have multiple developers? What line(s) do I need to add/modify/remove?

If you think the contribution by that author is worth of crediting, credit her/him. If she or he asks for credits, credit as well.

2. If someone contributes a single line to my project, does it mean he needs to be added to LICENSE? To AUTHORS file(s)?

Normally authors are listed if they have produced a work in the meaning of the copyright. Often a single-line is not considered as of enough substance, however it depends on the line itself and not a rule of thumb. Some projects do some rules for a quick decision, as 15 lines minimum, however, some authors are contributing a lot of small things but ant very many places so after some time that can/does count as well. You need to discuss how you want to handle that with the development team.

3. If someone contributes a code, but I re-write it (completely, or partly), do I need to add him to LICENSE? To AUTHORS file(s)?

Sure. Imagine I would translate a book by someone else. It would be completely rewritten (or partly), but the work is based on the other persons work, so made made that together, you two are authors.

4. If someone contributes a document / suggest a feature and I accept it, do I need to add him to the LICENSE? to AUTHORS file(s)?

For the document contribution - if the document is under BSD 3 clause as well - you should. As software, a document can be as well a work in the sense of the copyright.

Suggestions however - as ideas - are not copyrightable. There ain't an author even, because an idea does not exist. It only exist what is a work. However in changelogs or the readme file, if someone had very good ideas and suggestions, those persons are credited as well. It's a bit as well which kind of style you prefer.

5. If someone suggest a bug fix (without submitting code), do I need to add him LICENSE and/or AUTHORS file(s)?

Probably. Could be an idea only, but the suggested bug fix might contain a description how to fix the application (pseudo-code), you translate into real code so a derivative work would have been created. So actually code would have been submitted - pseudo-code.

6. My project is in Python, in BSD license, do I need to include it in every Python file header, or just having a LICENSE file in root directory of the project is enough? (I'm asking copyright-wise, not style-wise).

This is a style question mainly. To make it more clear, you can just place a small header into each file telling the name of the software that file belongs to and pointing to the LICENSE and/or AUTHORS file.

See as well a related question: Automatically managing license/author/version header in source files

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