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I ran into this issue while testing a rails app deployed to two different staging servers, in different time zones (PDT and CDT). Both servers have rails using the default UTC config.time_zone. Apart from the timezone configuration being different, both servers have their clocks set correctly.

Below is what I see in a rails console:

On the server where system timezone is CDT,

Time.zone.parse("Mon May 28 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)")
 => Mon, 28 May 2012 05:00:00 UTC +00:00 

On the server where system timezone is PDT,

Time.zone.parse("Mon May 28 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)")
 => Mon, 28 May 2012 07:00:00 UTC +00:00

The string Mon May 28 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT) is an arbitrary date-time value sent by a client. This is a common scenario when using a javascript Date object coming in via the rails params collection.

Why are the two results Time.zone.parse(identical_date_time_string) different?

If I run the following on both systems, the result appears correct:

"Mon May 28 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (PDT)".to_time
 => 2012-05-28 07:00:00 UTC

I'm running rails 3.2.3 with ruby 1.9.3-p125, on ubuntu.

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1  
Opened an issue against rails github.com/rails/rails/issues/5770 –  Shyam Habarakada Apr 7 '12 at 17:19
    
Managed to patch ActiveSupport::TimeZone to handle date strings of the format here. You can find the patch here, in comments. –  Shyam Habarakada Apr 7 '12 at 18:50
    
The original issue is now fixed in rails, with this commit github.com/rails/rails/commit/… –  Shyam Habarakada May 20 '13 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

ActiveSupportTimeZone.parse makes no attempt to extract the time zone information out of the given string. It simply extracts the date and time and converts it to a TimeWithZone with the given (local) time zone.

str.to_time will take notice of the "GMT-0700" line, but will produce a time without a time zone.

You could fudge it by extracting the "GMT....." part and converting that to a UTC offset, which is close to, but not exactly, the time zone.

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Hi Michael, I added more details about how the same date-time string is parsed correctly when using the ."to_time" method on the string. That works consistently and accurately. –  Shyam Habarakada Apr 7 '12 at 16:25

Here is how I do it

> Time.zone = "Hawaii"
=> "Hawaii"
> Time.zone.parse("Tue Mar 13 2012 13:00:00 GMT+1300 (NZDT)".sub("GMT",""))
=> Mon, 12 Mar 2012 14:00:00 HST -10:00
> Time.zone = "UTC"
=> "UTC"
> Time.zone.parse("Tue Mar 13 2012 13:00:00 GMT+1300 (NZDT)".sub("GMT",""))
=> Tue, 13 Mar 2012 00:00:00 UTC 00:00
share|improve this answer
    
Joseph, the issue is now fixed in rails. See github.com/rails/rails/commit/… –  Shyam Habarakada May 20 '13 at 23:12
    
@ShyamHabarakada Thanks for the tip. Glad they have finally got that sorted –  JosephL May 27 '13 at 0:00
    
you're welcome. –  Shyam Habarakada Jul 1 '13 at 15:53

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