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This is my property on my code :

public KPage Padre
{
    get
    {
        if (k_oPagina.father != null)
        {
            this.Padre = new KPage((int)k_oPagina.father);
        }
        else
        {
            this.Padre = null;
        }

        return this.Padre;
    }
    set { }
}

but it says :

An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred in App_Code.rhj3qeaw.dll

Why? How can I fix it?

EDIT

After correct the code, this is my actual code :

private KPage PadreInterno;
public KPage Padre
{
    get
    {
        if (PadreInterno == null)
        {
            if (paginaDB.father != null)
            {
                PadreInterno = new KPage((int)paginaDB.father);
            }
            else
            {
                PadreInterno= null;
            }
        }

        return PadreInterno;
    }
}

What do you think about?

share|improve this question
    
What is else { PadreInterno= null; } good for in the corrected code? You call this code only if PadreInterno is null anyway: if (PadreInterno == null). Simplify like this if (PadreInterno == null && paginaDB.father != null) { PadreInterno = new KPage((int)paginaDB.father); } return PadreInterno; –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 7 '12 at 17:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The property is calling itself... usually properties call underlying fields:

   public KPage Padre
   {
       get
       {
           if (k_oPagina.father != null)
           {
               _padre = new KPage((int)k_oPagina.father);
           }
           else
           {
               _padre = null;
           }

           return _padre;
       }
       set { }
   }

   private KPage _padre;

Your old code was recursively calling the get of the Padre property, hence the exception.

If your code only "gets" and doesn't need to store the value, you could also get rid of the backing field entirely:

   public KPage Padre
   {
       get
       {
           return k_oPagina.father != null
              ? new KPage((int)k_oPagina.father)
              : (KPage)null;
       }
   }

That said, I'd put this in a method.

This is also the same issue as the one you asked a couple of days ago:

An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred

share|improve this answer
    
It's fairly common to have a property loaded lazily; that is the first time it's asked for it's constructed and set to an internal property and in all future calls that property is just returned. Some properties are also inherently derived data, and so construct an object to return every time. OP's code is worth reconsidering, but it's not 100% evil. –  Servy Apr 7 '12 at 16:33
    
@Servy True enough, I forgot about that use case. This isn't a typical case of lazy loading, mind you. –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 7 '12 at 16:35
    
agreed, which is why I said he should reconsider if this is a good model, just not reject it outright. –  Servy Apr 7 '12 at 16:39
    
@Servy I agree somewhat. A property that returns a different object every time should be considered for a method instead, but that is just preference. –  Adam Houldsworth Apr 7 '12 at 16:42
    
Well, check my updated code! Maybe this time it is good? –  markzzz Apr 7 '12 at 16:45

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