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I made a simple GPS. app. for android, storing the route coordinates into file. I'm confused, I got more onLocationChanged event when I stand in one place. The bearing and speed was zero of course in the Location when the event comes, but it Is interested, because I used 1 meter for minDistance when I registered the LocationListener. (the minTime was zero)

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Are you sure that the values returned by getLatitude and getLongitude are identical to their previous values? Normal GPS is only accurate to within a meter or two, so it seems to me that random shifting of your location as perceived by your GPS sensor could be the problem.

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The returned longitude and lattitude values didn't identical when I stand in one place. Is those event I got by my device inaccurate? –  Laszlo Apr 7 '12 at 16:55
    
@Laszlo Any sensor that interfaces with the real world is susceptible to noise. Since your latitude and longitude are changing slightly between readings, that is what is happening. Your best bet is to have some code in your onLocationChange that checks the past couple of readings to see if you are moving in any given direction at all. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_(electronics) –  Ross Aiken Apr 8 '12 at 22:44

You may be registering with more GPS satellites as your app runs and this may shift your position and reduce the error in all the times received from all the gps signals. Also, as you stand still position will become more and more accurate it is possible to get a gps signal accuracy down to cms see: http://atarist.home.xs4all.nl/geo/gps_accuracy.htm and wiki link on real time kinematic especially if you get a connection to a reference signal

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