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I'm trying to assign a function to a variable field, but I get Segmentation fault. Here is the code:

typedef struct node{
    int info;
    struct node *link;
    void* (*make) (int x);
}node;

void* make_node(int x)
{
    node* new_node = (node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
    new_node->info = x;
    new_node->link = NULL;
    return new_node;
}

int main(){
  struct node *n;
  n->make = make_node;
  return 0;
}

What could be wrong?

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Which compiler are you using? – IndieProgrammer Apr 7 '12 at 16:46
2  
That does not matter. The code is wrong regardless of a compiler. – mark Apr 7 '12 at 16:52

you need to allocate some space to node on heap or just use a normal variable of the structure instead of a pointer.

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for heap we have to use new keyword and code is in c. – IndieProgrammer Apr 7 '12 at 16:45
1  
malloc is as good as new – mark Apr 7 '12 at 16:46

Your n variable into main() is uninitialised. The make_node() function will reserve space for a node structure, so why not call it inside main()? You may try the code below.

typedef struct {
    int info;
    struct node *link;
    void* (*make) (int x);
} node;

void *make_node(int x)
{
    node* new_node = malloc(sizeof(node));
    new_node->info = x;
    new_node->link = NULL;
    return new_node;
}

int main() {
  struct node *n;
  n = make_node(1);

  free (n);
  return 0;
}

p.s avoid casting malloc returns

p.s.2 pay attention for the same problem when you'll use struct node *link inside node

p.s.3 remember to free() unused malloc()ed variables.

share|improve this answer

You have forgotten to assign a value to n.

  1. Change the return type of make_node to node*
  2. Do n=make_node(x)

And I strongly advise reading http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0131103628/ref=redir_mdp_mobile This would be the best thing you can do now.

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Did you mean that first I have to fill info and link? If you mean that, it doesen't work. – yonutix Apr 7 '12 at 16:34
1  
Right now n references random location. You must assign it to a valid memory address, either on the stack or on the heap. – mark Apr 7 '12 at 16:38

With the existing infrastructure, you could write:

typedef struct node
{
    int            info;
    struct node   *link;
    void        *(*make)(int x);
} node;

void *make_node(int x)
{
    node* new_node = (node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
    new_node->info = x;
    new_node->link = NULL;
    new_node->make = make_node;
    return new_node;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct node *n = make_node(1);
    ...use the newly allocated node...
    return 0;
}

This allocates the node before you try to write to it. It also fully initializes the node by setting every field to a known value. If you need a different function pointer for the make member, you can adjust afterwards.

share|improve this answer

You can allocate space for n on the stack this way:

int main() {
  struct node n;
  n.make = make_node;
  return 0;
}

Otherwise you'd have to allocate it on the heap perhaps as a global variable or using malloc().

share|improve this answer
    
You don't want the parentheses after make_node, do you? – Jonathan Leffler Apr 7 '12 at 18:53
    
@Jonathan indeed not :) – gcbenison Apr 7 '12 at 19:08

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