Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class:

template <typename T>
class matrix
{
private:
    int _n;
    T* array;
public:
    matrix(): _n(0) 
    {
        array = new T[_n * _n];
    }
    matrix(int n): _n(n)
    {
        if( n < 0 )
            throw "Invalid array size!";
        array = new T[_n * _n];
    }
    ~matrix()
    {
        delete[] array;
    }
    void Set(const int x, const int y,const T val)
    {
        if( ( x<0 || x>_n ) && ( y<0 || y>_n) )
            throw "Invalid index";
        array[x*_n + y] = val;
    }
    T& Get(const int x, const int y)
    {
        if( ( x<0 || x>_n ) && ( y<0 || y>_n) )
            throw "Invalid index";
        return array[x*_n + y];
    }
};

and using it this way:

matrix<int> k(5);
k.Set(5,5,6);
cout<<k.Get(5,5);

The problem is I get a heap corruption error when calling Set. What am I doing wrong? (my guess is it's the way I access they array elements)

share|improve this question
    
Note also that your default constructor calls array new with size 0. A pointer returned by that call is practically useless since dereferencing it is undefined behaviour. –  jrok Apr 7 '12 at 16:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A 5 element array can be accessed at the indexes 0-4. You're passing 5 for x and y, which results in an invalid index when accessing array.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn, I totally missed that ! Thanks! –  user1233963 Apr 7 '12 at 16:59
1  
@user1233963 - If you, for some reason, wish to retain that approach (1-based), you can simply decrement the x and y before you calculate the final index for resolving an element of the array. I'd recommend zero-based, get used to it and love it. –  user1309389 Apr 7 '12 at 17:03

Arrays in C++ are 0-base, that means if you have an array int x[5], x[5] is invalid.

Your conditions should be if( ( x<0 || x>=_n ) && ( y<0 || y>=_n) ) and if( ( x<0 || x>=_n ) && ( y<0 || y>=_n) )

To set the last element, you'd need

k.Set(4,4,6);

and to print it:

cout<<k.Get(4,4);
share|improve this answer

What is worng is that you have to start counting from 0. If you create a array with size n*n you can acces the element up to (n-1)*(n-1). Your example create a arry of size 5*5=25 and trys to acces element 25. However 24 is the highes element you array contains.

share|improve this answer

You are indexing beyond the array into memory which is why you are getting the error.

The issue is with indexing. The indexing of arrays in C++ starts at 0, so for your declaration of k(5), it produces an array of 5 which is indexed 0-4, so an index of 5 is not a valid valid index. You should change your check in set to be x>=_n and y>=_n, as and index of 5 is not valid.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.