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I have to create a program that reads names and ID numbers from two files that are already in alphabetical order, and combine them on a third file completely in alphabetical order.. The files are organized like so...

last name, first name ID (ex. rbb091020) last name, first name ID

For some reason my file reads the two files and creates a third, but it doesn't write anything to the third file.

Here's my code...

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Combine_Files
{
public static void main(String[]args) throws IOException
{
    String filename1 = "";
    String filename2 = "";
    String combinedFileName = "";
    String response = "";
    String nextName1 = "";
    String nextName2 = "";
    String nextIDNumber1 = "";
    String nextIDNumber2 = "";
    boolean okToOverwrite = false;
    Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.println("What is the name of the first file?");
    filename1 = keyboard.nextLine();

    File file1 = new File(filename1);

    if (!file1.exists())
    {
        System.out.println(file1 + " does not exist.\nTerminating Program.");
        System.exit(0);
    }

    System.out.println("What is the name of the second file?");
    filename2 = keyboard.nextLine();

    File file2 = new File (filename2);
    if (!file2.exists())
    {
        System.out.println(file2 + " does not exist.\nTerminating Program.");
        System.exit(0);
    }   

    System.out.println("What is the name of the file that you wish to create?");
    combinedFileName = keyboard.nextLine();
    File combinedFile = new File (combinedFileName);

    while (combinedFile.exists() && !okToOverwrite)
    {
        System.out.println("\nError, a file named " +
            combinedFileName + " already exists." +
            "\nWould you like to overwrite this file?" +  
            "\nEnter Y for Yes or N for No.");
        response = keyboard.nextLine();

        // Add input validation on response

        if (response.equalsIgnoreCase("Y"))
        {
            okToOverwrite = true;
        }
        else 
        {
            System.out.println("Enter a new filename.");
            combinedFileName = keyboard.nextLine();
            combinedFile = new File(combinedFileName);
        }
    }

    if (file1.exists() && file2.exists())
    {

        Scanner list1 = new Scanner(file1);
        Scanner list2 = new Scanner(file2);
        PrintWriter outputFile = new PrintWriter(combinedFile);

            while (list1.hasNext() && list2.hasNext())
            {
                nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
                nextName2 = list2.nextLine();

                if(nextName1.compareToIgnoreCase(nextName2) <0)
                {
                    outputFile.print(nextName1);
                    nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
                    outputFile.print(nextName1);
                }
                else if(nextName1.compareToIgnoreCase(nextName2) >0)
                {
                    outputFile.println(nextName2);
                    nextName2 = list2.nextLine();
                    outputFile.println(nextName2);
                }
                else
                {
                    outputFile.println(nextName1);
                    nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
                    outputFile.println(nextName1);
                    outputFile.println(nextName2);
                    nextName2 = list2.nextLine();
                    outputFile.println(nextName2);
                }       
            }

            while (list1.hasNext() && !list2.hasNext())
            {
                outputFile.println(nextName1);
            }

            while (list2.hasNext() && !list1.hasNext())
            {
                outputFile.println(nextName2);
            }       
    }
}   
}           
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

When you use a writer class like PrintWriter you need to make sure that you call the flush() method every time you want to print something to STDOUT or a file. So basically whenever you call any of the PrintWriter print methods it writes to an internal buffer, the call to flush() sends the buffer to the appropriate output stream.

        while (list1.hasNext() && list2.hasNext())
        {
            nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
            nextName2 = list2.nextLine();

            if(nextName1.compareToIgnoreCase(nextName2) <0)
            {
                outputFile.print(nextName1);
                nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
                outputFile.print(nextName1);
            }
            else if(nextName1.compareToIgnoreCase(nextName2) >0)
            {
                outputFile.println(nextName2);
                nextName2 = list2.nextLine();
                outputFile.println(nextName2);
            }
            else
            {
                outputFile.println(nextName1);
                nextName1 = list1.nextLine();
                outputFile.println(nextName1);
                outputFile.println(nextName2);
                nextName2 = list2.nextLine();
                outputFile.println(nextName2);
            }
            outputFile.flush(); // <--- flush added here       
        }

        while (list1.hasNext() && !list2.hasNext())
        {
            outputFile.println(nextName1);
            outputFile.flush(); // <--- flush added here 
        }

        while (list2.hasNext() && !list1.hasNext())
        {
            outputFile.println(nextName2);
            outputFile.flush(); // <--- flush added here 
        }       

These calls to flush() should write to the file.

share|improve this answer
    
or simply make it autoFlush at invoking the constructor PrintWriter(OutputStream out, boolean autoFlush) –  Eng.Fouad Apr 7 '12 at 17:19
    
flushing issues were my first suspect, but even then, the file should be flushed when the handle is closed and the VM exits. this program has other problems. –  aaron Apr 7 '12 at 17:23
    
@Eng.Fouad According to the docs the autoflush option only works for println, printf, and format. The poster is using print() mixed with println, so I opted for manual flush() calls –  Hunter McMillen Apr 7 '12 at 17:23
    
@HunterMcMillen That's weird! However, close()ing the stream at the end will buffer the data into the sink. –  Eng.Fouad Apr 7 '12 at 17:25
    
We haven't learned about flush() yet, and we're not suppose to use things other than what we learned. But we have learned that things get stuck in the keyboard buffer.. Would using keyboard.nextLine(); work to flush it? Isn't there another way to flush it? –  rahme24 Apr 7 '12 at 18:27

This program has logical errors. When I test with files of uneven length, it gets stuck in an infinite loop in one of the last two while loops, and indeed writes to the output file until the program is forcefully terminated. If the files are of the same length, then scanner fails to read a line in one of the if/else clauses.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I fix it? –  rahme24 Apr 7 '12 at 18:28
    
Also, how did you get it to write to the third file? It only writes a blank file to my third file for some reason. –  rahme24 Apr 7 '12 at 18:29
    
I don't know why it wouldn't write to the output file off the top of my head, but the behavior probably varies with input. My two files simply contained "a" "b" "c" and "d" "e" "f" respectively, each on a line of course. You need to debug this program, either by printing output (System.err.println("Writing xxxx to file yyy")) or via a step debugger, so you understand what the program is doing. –  aaron Apr 9 '12 at 20:59

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