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I have following code:

Document document;
char *buf = new char[str.size()+1];
buf[str.size()] = '\0';
memcpy(buf, str.c_str(), str.size());
//string parsing
if (document.ParseInsitu<0>(buf).HasParseError()) {
    cerr << "Failed to parse string ";
}
delete[] buf;

When I check the program with valgrind I get this:

==29765== Invalid read of size 1
==29765==    at 0x402A682: bcmp (mc_replace_strmem.c:679)
==29765==  Address 0x49626a2 is 2 bytes inside a block of size 214 free'd
==29765==    at 0x402759B: operator delete[](void*) (vg_replace_malloc.c:409)

==29765== Invalid read of size 1
==29765==    at 0x402901A: strlen (mc_replace_strmem.c:282)
==29765==    by 0x41ABE4A: std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&) (in /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.16)
==29765==  Address 0x49626a8 is 8 bytes inside a block of size 214 free'd
==29765==    at 0x402759B: operator delete[](void*) (vg_replace_malloc.c:409)

==29765== Invalid read of size 1
==29765==    at 0x4029D0E: memcpy (mc_replace_strmem.c:635)
==29765==    by 0x41ABD15: char* std::string::_S_construct<char const*>(char const*, char const*, std::allocator<char> const&, std::forward_iterator_tag) (in /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.16)
==29765==    by 0x41ABE65: std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&) (in /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6.0.16)
==29765==    by 0x2C23: ???
==29765==  Address 0x49626b2 is 18 bytes inside a block of size 214 free'd
==29765==    at 0x402759B: operator delete[](void*) (vg_replace_malloc.c:409)

what am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
where is json defined? it is the same as str? –  Mike Corcoran Apr 7 '12 at 18:11
1  
buf[json.size()] = '\0'; is json.size() == str.size() ? –  keety Apr 7 '12 at 18:12
    
sorry, I was trying to make it more readable... that's the same variable –  Tombart Apr 7 '12 at 18:17
    
Can't see an error in the snipped. Can you give the signature of document.ParseInsitu<0>(buf), or try if it works if you comment out the if statement? I think the error is that the parser still uses buf, after the document.ParseInsitu<0>(buf) call. –  Haatschii Apr 7 '12 at 18:24
    
it's from rapidjson library: code.google.com/p/rapidjson/source/browse/trunk/include/… –  Tombart Apr 7 '12 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem was that I was deallocating buf too early. I supposed that the parser will make a copy of the input, which was obviously wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not get it. you deallocated buf in the last line, right? –  fchen Oct 24 '14 at 18:28
buf[json.size()] = '\0';

isn't this supposed to be:

buf[str.size()] = '\0';

?

share|improve this answer
    
No, buf[json.size()] = '\0'; should be correct. Array starts counting at 0. –  Haatschii Apr 7 '12 at 18:14
1  
buf[str.size() +1 ] is a buffer overflow –  keety Apr 7 '12 at 18:14
    
If so, it should be buf[str.size()] = '\0' since arrays index from 0. –  DRVic Apr 7 '12 at 18:15
    
yup, thanks - edited. –  Nemanja Boric Apr 7 '12 at 18:15

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