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unordered_map<std::string,unordered_map<std::string, std::string> >* storing_vars;

I have this variable in the scope declared in the scope.

This is declared in the constructor.

this->storing_vars =  new unordered_map<std::string,unordered_map<std::string, std::string> >();

in order to initialize it.

Then what I do is call a function over and over again by my BackgroundWorker

for(int i2 = 0; i2 < 30; i2++){



                int index_pos_curr = i2;


                //Start the Threads HERE


                this->backgroundWorker2 = gcnew System::ComponentModel::BackgroundWorker;
                this->backgroundWorker2->WorkerReportsProgress = true;
                this->backgroundWorker2->WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;


                //this->backgroundWorker2->FieldSetter(L"std::string",L"test","damnnit");

                backgroundWorker2->DoWork += gcnew DoWorkEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_DoWork );
                backgroundWorker2->RunWorkerCompleted += gcnew RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_RunWorkerCompleted );
                backgroundWorker2->ProgressChanged += gcnew ProgressChangedEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_ProgressChanged );
                backgroundWorker2->RunWorkerAsync(index_pos_curr);
                Sleep(50); //THE PROBLEM IS HERE, IF I COMMENT THIS OUT it won't work, that's probably because there are a lot of functions trying to add values in the same variable (even though the indexes are differents in each call)
            }

After this is done it calls the DoWork Function

void backgroundWorker2_DoWork(Object^ sender, DoWorkEventArgs^ e ){
             BackgroundWorker^ worker = dynamic_cast<BackgroundWorker^>(sender);         
             e->Result = SendThem( safe_cast<Int32>(e->Argument), worker, e );          

        }

int SendThem(int index){

            stringstream st;
            st << index;

            //...
            (*this->storing_vars)[st.str()]["index"] =  "testing1";
            (*this->storing_vars)[st.str()]["rs"] = "testing2";
            return 0;
}

as I added the comment in the Sleep(50) line, I believe the problem is that since the thread in the background call the same function, it has a problem to store the data when it's called a lot of times probably not even waiting for the other storing to finish, it's causing an error in the "xhash.h" file, an error that is sanitized by using Sleep(50), but I can't use those because it freezes my UI and also 50 miliseconds is the time I'm assuming it already stored the variable value, but what if it takes longer in slower computers? it's not the right approach.

How do I do to fix that?

I want to be able to UPDATE the unordered_map WITHOUT the use of SLEEP

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
Is it fair to summarize that the problem is because you are trying to update the same unordered_map from two different threads. And you are attempting to fix it by adding sleep? Is that the issue? –  Gangadhar Apr 7 '12 at 18:39
3  
where is your synchronisation mechanism? I see none.... –  UmNyobe Apr 7 '12 at 18:41
    
no, I don't want to use Sleep, I'm saying that Sleep is the only way I found to not cause that problem, I want it to be able to update the same unordered_map over and over again by different threads at the same time without the error it throws in the file "xhash" (probably from the unordered_map headers), So I don't want to sleep it I want it to work WITHOUT Sleep –  Grego Apr 7 '12 at 18:50
3  
@Grego : A mutex or a critical section. You're using a thread-unsafe class in a multithreaded context, what did you expect to happen? –  ildjarn Apr 7 '12 at 19:06
3  
@Grego: then there's your problem. Would you drive a car without knowing what the steering wheel is? You need to know what you're doing. That includes knowing what mutexes and critical sections are, and it means knowing what (if any) multthreading guarantees are given by the data structure you're using –  jalf Apr 7 '12 at 21:32

3 Answers 3

I found one solution by predefining the index of the unordered_map I wanna use it, the problem is just creating the index, updating seems to be ok with multiple threads.

for(int i2 = 0; i2 < 30; i2++){



                int index_pos_curr = i2;


                //Start the Threads HERE


                this->backgroundWorker2 = gcnew System::ComponentModel::BackgroundWorker;
                this->backgroundWorker2->WorkerReportsProgress = true;
                this->backgroundWorker2->WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
                backgroundWorker2->DoWork += gcnew DoWorkEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_DoWork );
                backgroundWorker2->RunWorkerCompleted += gcnew RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_RunWorkerCompleted ); stringstream st; st << index_pos_curr;

                (*this->storing_vars)[st.str()]["index"] = ""; 
               //This ^^^^^ will initialize it and then in the BackgroundWorker will only update, this way it doesn't crash. :)

                backgroundWorker2->ProgressChanged += gcnew ProgressChangedEventHandler( this, &MainFacebook::backgroundWorker2_ProgressChanged );
                backgroundWorker2->RunWorkerAsync(index_pos_curr);
                Sleep(50); //THE PROBLEM IS HERE, IF I COMMENT THIS OUT it won't work, that's probably because there are a lot of functions trying to add values in the same variable (even though the indexes are differents in each call)
            }
share|improve this answer
3  
just.... try to understand the problem, rather than randomly modifying your code until something seems to work –  jalf Apr 7 '12 at 21:26
    
I did and I explained in the comments, I said that the problem is that the variable was being created at the same time, so if I create it before, it will already have a memory address and then it will only have to store in that address and not create another one, multiple creations of memory at the same time may cause an error depending on how fast it goes to memory or the program sends the command. –  Grego Apr 7 '12 at 21:29
    
You still invoke Undefined Behavior, only now it manifests in seemingly doing what you want the code to do. Unfortunately, this is one way of UB to manifest itself. Even more unfortunately, it might suddenly start to do something else for no apparent reason. Thus is the nature of UB. –  sbi Apr 8 '12 at 15:41

You can only modify the standard library containers (including, but not limited to, unordered_map) from one thread at a time. The solution is to use critical sections, mutexes, locks to synchronize access. If you don't know what these are, then you need to know before you try to create multiple threads.

No ifs, buts or why's.

If you have multiple threads, you need mechanism to synchronize them, to serialize access to shared data. Common synchronization mechanisms are the ones mentioned above, so go look them up.

share|improve this answer
5  
Sorry, it doesn't work that way. You can't make a working solution without understanding how to make a working solution. Being on a deadline doesn't change that. It just means you're irresponsible, and are going to let your boss/teacher/whatever down –  jalf Apr 7 '12 at 21:45
4  
@Grego: It is just working for a particular point in time, it may stop working tomorrow when its colder or warmer, or on another computer, or when you are listening to different music. This is what you don't understand, but what you need to understand to make it work. –  PlasmaHH Apr 7 '12 at 22:04
1  
@Grego : Use a search engine. This is all explained a thousand times over in various articles/books/tutorials. Show a little effort. –  ildjarn Apr 7 '12 at 22:51
2  
@Grego the problem is that it is not a simple question. Multithreading and synchronization is basically one of the most complex subjects in programming, and you ask for it to be explained to you in a comment. At the very least, post a new question just for that. –  jalf Apr 8 '12 at 9:34
4  
@Grego: no, what you're doing with AJAX is not multithreading. It's one thread invoking asynchronous functions. You can do the same in C++ (and it's quite a bit simpler and safer than actually having multiple threads). However, the simplest solution in your case is to just use a single thread, and perform every operation synchronously. Hope that helps. :) –  jalf Apr 8 '12 at 13:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After so many votes down I actually started to look for the Mutex, people were talking about here, after a while I find out that it's really simple to use. and it's the correct way as my fellows here told me. Thank you all for the help =D

Here what I did, I just had to add

//Declare the Mutex
static Mutex^ mut = gcnew Mutex;

//then inside the function called over and over again I used mutex
mut->WaitOne();
//Declare/Update the variables
mut->ReleaseMutex();
//Then I release it.

It works perfectly, Thank you all for the helps and criticism. haha

share|improve this answer
    
O.M.G. (7 more to go) –  sbi Apr 8 '12 at 22:08
    
haha I don't get it @sbi, what are you "OhMyGod"ing about? '-' –  Grego Apr 8 '12 at 22:43

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