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public class Widget {
    @Inject
    Fizz fizz;

    public Widget(Fizz fizz) {
        super();

        setFizz(fizz);
    }

    public void setFizz(Fizz fizz) {
        this.fizz = fizz;
    }
}

Is this a Guice anti-pattern?!?!

If I say "fizz will be injected (via @Inject)", but then I allow a constructor and setter to accept a fizz, is this unnecessarily-redundant? Could it cause a conflict with Guice's injector?

I guess I'm confused as to:

  • When you should annotate a property with @Inject, vs.
  • When you should "inject" the property yourself via constructor/getter

Any thoughts? Thanks in advance!

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Don't know why it'd conflict (I just don't know) but it seems like there's no reason to explicitly disallow setting your own Fizz outside of Guice unless that's a specific goal. –  Dave Newton Apr 7 '12 at 18:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why not use something like this (i.e. use constructor injection) ?

public class Widget {
    private Fizz fizz;

    @Inject
    public Widget(Fizz fizz) {
        super();

        this.fizz = fizz;
    }

}

See also http://code.google.com/p/google-guice/wiki/Injections

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Whats the difference? How does Guice behave different if I annotate the property, as opposed to the constructor? –  IAmYourFaja Apr 7 '12 at 18:44
    
When classes need several dependencies, annotating the constructor once saves you from annotating every field. –  Philipp Reichart Apr 7 '12 at 18:46
    
Difference is the time those variable become available. If you do constructor injection you obviously can use them in the constructor, where if you use getter/setter injection the injected members are only useable after the constructor is finnished. –  mglauche Apr 7 '12 at 18:46
    
Under what circumstances would you annotate the property directly (instead of the constructor)? –  IAmYourFaja Apr 7 '12 at 18:58
    
usually in normal service methods that don't have a constructor i use property injection (mostly because of the easier reading though) –  mglauche Apr 7 '12 at 19:25

You should use Constructor Injection for dependencies that are REQUIRED. Use Property Injection when the dependency is OPTIONAL.

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I would definitely say this is a problem, not because Guice can't do it, but because your code has a bug. Guice will try to invoke the default no-arg constructor (which doesn't exist) and fail.

But even if you added the no-arg constructor, this is still an anti-pattern. I've used DI frameworks for a while and never encountered a need to do field injection. I'm sure there's a use case for it, otherwise the Guice guys wouldn't have included it, but it makes your code impossible to test without special code, either bytecode manipulation or reflection.

Constructor injection is generally best for a number of reasons. It makes it clear to any caller exactly what your dependencies are, it allows you to initialze all your class's invariants at the same time (avoiding a partially-initialized class), and it's the only DI flavor that lets you create immutable objects, which are thread-safe and reduce program complexity.

My only use cases for method injection are when I don't want to require a subclass to declare the parent's dependencies, or when I want an "optional" dependency, but these are rare.

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