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Possible Duplicate:
How Do I Access This Variable?

Lets say I have the code:

class Player
  def getsaves
    print "Saves: "
    saves = gets
  end
  def initialize(saves, era, holds, strikeouts, whip)
  end
end

I want to be able to access the saves variable in getsaves in the initialize method say:

j = Player.new(getsaves_saves_variable, 30, 30, 30, 30)
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marked as duplicate by Andrew Marshall, philant, Chuck, Michael Berkowski, coreyward Apr 7 '12 at 19:05

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

define the attributes:

attr_accessor :saves_attr
attr_accessor :era_attr
attr_accessor :holds_attr
attr_accessor :strikeouts_attr
attr_accessor :whip_attr

def initialize(saves, era, holds, strikeouts, whip)
   self.saves = saves
   self.era_attr = era
   ...
end

then in getsaves you can do:

self.saves_attr = gets
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Doing self.saves= is a somewhat-backwards way to say @saves =. Also attr_accessor can take a list of symbols. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 7 '12 at 19:53
    
I like the self way of doing things as since @saves wasn't explicitly declared in the code it reads cleaner. I can see i defined an attribute, and I can see I am using an attribute. they act the same, but I feel one reads better. –  Ben Miller Apr 7 '12 at 19:57
    
Well, self.saves=(val) just does @saves = val anyway, and I would say that def saves=(val) isn't explicitly declared either since it's just defined by attr_accessor. Further, instance variables never need to be declared either since they're all nil by default anyway. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 7 '12 at 20:26

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