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I've successfully merged 3 tables (using ID's), but when I try to add 4th table - output completely messes up (values become unrealistic/wrong) so I think that I has something to do with the fact, that this 4th table has ungrouped ID's, so I need to group them before Joining this new table. Right now the query is following:

SELECT name, SUM(money) AS MONEY
FROM transactions
JOIN results ON transactions.id = results.id
JOIN more ON results.per_id = more.per_id
GROUP BY name
HAVING SUM(money)>500

and when I join new table:

SELECT name, SUM(money) AS MONEY, SUM(data_from_NT1), SUM(data_from_NT2)
FROM transactions
JOIN results ON transactions.id = results.id
JOIN more ON results.per_id = more.per_id

JOIN newtable ON results.per_id = newtable.per_id

GROUP BY name
HAVING SUM(money)>500

is it possible to execute a command GROUP BY per_id:

(JOIN newtable ON results.per_id = newtable.per_id GROUP BY per_id)

before adding this new table into the main table? The line from above doesn't work.

share|improve this question
1  
What type of relationship exists between new table and results? Could there be 0, one or many records in new table? I ask becuase your results values will be doubled in transactions and results and some records may be eliminted if per_ID doens't exist in more or newTable. It might be that you want to use LEFT joins instead of full joins. Some data output along with expected results would help identify the problem here. – xQbert Apr 7 '12 at 19:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible, but you have to write it as a SELECT. This is a first version of a possible answer:

SELECT name,
       SUM(money)             AS money,
       SUM(nt2.data_from_NT1) AS data_from_NT1,
       SUM(nt2.data_from_NT2) AS data_from_NT2
  FROM transactions AS t
  JOIN results      AS r ON t.id = r.id
  JOIN more         AS m ON r.per_id = m.per_id
  JOIN (SELECT per_id, SUM(data_from_NT1) AS data_from_NT1, SUM(data_from_NT2) AS data_from_NT2
          FROM newtable GROUP BY per_id
       ) AS nt2 ON results.per_id = nt2.per_id
 GROUP BY name
HAVING SUM(money) > 500;

It isn't completely clear whether you need the 'SUM of SUMs' in the main select-list; you probably don't. It also isn't clear where the name or money columns come from; I'd normally prefix them with the appropriate table alias, too. With those caveats, this might be more nearly what you're after:

SELECT name, SUM(money) AS MONEY, nt2.data_from_NT1, nt2.data_from_NT2
  FROM transactions AS t
  JOIN results      AS r ON t.id = r.id
  JOIN more         AS m ON r.per_id = m.per_id
  JOIN (SELECT per_id, SUM(data_from_NT1) AS data_from_NT1, SUM(data_from_NT2) AS data_from_NT2
          FROM newtable GROUP BY per_id
       ) AS nt2 ON results.per_id = nt2.per_id
 GROUP BY name, nt2.data_from_NT1, nt2.data_from_NT2
HAVING SUM(money) > 500;

There are undoubtedly other ways to write this. The grouping in the main query might be better put into a parallel sub-query, leaving simple direct joins in the main query. But we don't have the information to actually do that for you.

share|improve this answer
    
hello sir! you were right when you said that I don't need the "sum of sums".. I was about to ask why values returned from the new table are doubled/tripled and then I noticed your answer. Great, thank you! – Alex Apr 8 '12 at 7:45

You could move the group by to a subquery:

join   (
       select  per_id
       ,       sum(col1) as col1_avg
       ,       avg(col2) as col2_avg
       from    newtable 
       group by
               per_id
       ) as newtable
on     results.per_id = newtable.per_id

If you group on per_id, any other column has to be aggregated.

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