Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a recursive table (e.g. employees with managers) and a list of size 0..n of ids. How can I find the lowest common parent for these ids?

For example, if my table looks like this:

Id | ParentId
---|---------
 1 |     NULL
 2 |        1
 3 |        1
 4 |        2
 5 |        2
 6 |        3
 7 |        3
 8 |        7

Then the following sets of ids lead to the following results (the first one is a corner case):

[]      => 1 (or NULL, doesn't really matter)
[1]     => 1
[2]     => 2
[1,8]   => 1
[4,5]   => 2
[4,6]   => 1
[6,7,8] => 3

How to do this?

EDIT: Note that parent isn't the correct term in all cases. It's the lowest common node in all paths up the tree. The lowest common node can also be a node itself (for example in the case [1,8] => 1, node 1 is not a parent of node 1 but node 1 itself).

Kind regards, Ronald

share|improve this question
    
This is really lowest common parent or self if single item. –  RichardOD Jun 17 '09 at 8:33
    
That's correct, it's also self if self happens to be the lowest common node. I modified my question slightly to take this into account. –  Ronald Wildenberg Jun 17 '09 at 8:38
add comment

2 Answers

Here's one way of doing it; it uses a recursive CTE to find the ancestry of a node, and uses "CROSS APPLY" over the input values to get the common ancestry; you just change the values in @ids (table variable):

----------------------------------------- SETUP
CREATE TABLE MyData (
   Id int NOT NULL,
   ParentId int NULL)

INSERT MyData VALUES (1,NULL)
INSERT MyData VALUES (2,1)
INSERT MyData VALUES (3,1)
INSERT MyData VALUES (4,2)
INSERT MyData VALUES (5,2)
INSERT MyData VALUES (6,3)
INSERT MyData VALUES (7,3)
INSERT MyData VALUES (8,7)

GO
CREATE FUNCTION AncestorsUdf (@Id int)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
RETURN (
    WITH Ancestors (Id, ParentId)
    AS (
    	SELECT Id, ParentId
    	FROM MyData
    	WHERE Id = @Id
    	UNION ALL
    	SELECT md.Id, md.ParentId
    	FROM MyData md
    	INNER JOIN Ancestors a
    	  ON md.Id = a.ParentId
    )
    SELECT Id FROM Ancestors
);
GO
----------------------------------------- ACTUAL QUERY
DECLARE @ids TABLE (Id int NOT NULL)
DECLARE @Count int
-- your data (perhaps via a "split" udf)
INSERT @ids VALUES (6)
INSERT @ids VALUES (7)
INSERT @ids VALUES (8)

SELECT @Count = COUNT(1) FROM @ids
;
SELECT TOP 1 a.Id
FROM @ids
CROSS APPLY AncestorsUdf(Id) AS a
GROUP BY a.Id
HAVING COUNT(1) = @Count
ORDER BY a.ID DESC


Update if the nodes aren't strictly ascending:

CREATE FUNCTION AncestorsUdf (@Id int)
RETURNS @result TABLE (Id int, [Level] int)
AS
BEGIN
    WITH Ancestors (Id, ParentId, RelLevel)
    AS (
    	SELECT Id, ParentId, 0
    	FROM MyData
    	WHERE Id = @Id
    	UNION ALL
    	SELECT md.Id, md.ParentId, a.RelLevel - 1
    	FROM MyData md
    	INNER JOIN Ancestors a
    	  ON md.Id = a.ParentId
    )

    INSERT @result
    SELECT Id, RelLevel FROM Ancestors

    DECLARE @Min int
    SELECT @Min = MIN([Level]) FROM @result

    UPDATE @result SET [Level] = [Level] - @Min

    RETURN
END
GO

and

SELECT TOP 1 a.Id
FROM @ids
CROSS APPLY AncestorsUdf(Id) AS a
GROUP BY a.Id, a.[Level]
HAVING COUNT(1) = @Count
ORDER BY a.[Level] DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I had a little trouble understanding how it works, but I get it now. Am I correct if I say that the 'ORDER BY a.ID DESC' at the end only works because in the current configuration lower nodes have higher id's? –  Ronald Wildenberg Jun 17 '09 at 11:05
    
Yes; I'll see if I can do a version that doesn't rely on this... –  Marc Gravell Jun 17 '09 at 11:08
    
I have come up myself with a version that doesn't require a UDF and that uses the correct ordering. I'll post it ASAP.. –  Ronald Wildenberg Jun 17 '09 at 11:19
    
Hi, I marked my own answer as the answer. It's somewhat more compact and doesn't require a UDF. Thanks for pushing me in the right direction. –  Ronald Wildenberg Jun 19 '09 at 9:40
    
No problem; glad it helped. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 10:12
add comment
up vote 3 down vote accepted

After doing some thinking and some hints in the right direction from Marc's answer (thanks), I came up with another solution myself:

DECLARE @parentChild TABLE (Id INT NOT NULL, ParentId INT NULL);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (1, NULL);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (2, 1);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (3, 1);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (4, 2);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (5, 2);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (6, 3);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (7, 3);
INSERT INTO @parentChild VALUES (8, 7);

DECLARE @ids TABLE (Id INT NOT NULL);
INSERT INTO @ids VALUES (6);
INSERT INTO @ids VALUES (7);
INSERT INTO @ids VALUES (8);

DECLARE @count INT;
SELECT @count = COUNT(1) FROM @ids;

WITH Nodes(Id, ParentId, Depth) AS
(
    -- Start from every node in the @ids collection.
    SELECT pc.Id , pc.ParentId , 0 AS DEPTH
    FROM @parentChild pc
    JOIN @ids i ON pc.Id = i.Id

    UNION ALL

    -- Recursively find parent nodes for each starting node.
    SELECT pc.Id , pc.ParentId , n.Depth - 1
    FROM @parentChild pc
    JOIN Nodes n ON pc.Id = n.ParentId
)
SELECT n.Id
FROM Nodes n
GROUP BY n.Id
HAVING COUNT(n.Id) = @count
ORDER BY MIN(n.Depth) DESC

It now returns the entire path from the lowest common parent to the root node but that is a matter of adding a TOP 1 to the select.

share|improve this answer
    
You might have to watch that Depth is from the top down, not the bottom up - which might make a difference. I haven't bothered thinking about every edge case ;-p Looks good though, +1 –  Marc Gravell Jun 17 '09 at 11:51
    
Depth is a little susceptible to interpretation ;-p What orientation does your tree have, for example. I always picture it upside-down (root node on top). Therefore, I subtract 1 for every level 'up' in the tree. Anyway, I think I have the right ordering (at least I hope I do)... –  Ronald Wildenberg Jun 17 '09 at 12:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.