Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let me prefix this by saying that I know what foreach is, does and how to use it. This question concerns how it works under the bonnet, and I don't want any answers along the lines of "this is how you loop an array with foreach".


For a long time I assumed that foreach worked with the array itself. Then I found many references to the fact that it works with a copy of the array, and I have since assumed this to be the end of the story. But I recently got into a discussion on the matter, and after a little experimentation found that this was not in fact 100% true.

Let me show what I mean. For the following test cases, we will be working with the following array:

$array = array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

Test case 1:

foreach ($array as $item) {
  echo "$item\n";
  $array[] = $item;
}
print_r($array);

/* Output in loop:    1 2 3 4 5
   $array after loop: 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 */

This clearly shows that we are not working directly with the source array - otherwise the loop would continue forever, since we are constantly pushing items onto the array during the loop. But just to be sure this is the case:

Test case 2:

foreach ($array as $key => $item) {
  $array[$key + 1] = $item + 2;
  echo "$item\n";
}

print_r($array);

/* Output in loop:    1 2 3 4 5
   $array after loop: 1 3 4 5 6 7 */

This backs up our initial conclusion, we are working with a copy of the source array during the loop, otherwise we would see the modified values during the loop. But...

If we look in the manual, we find this statement:

When foreach first starts executing, the internal array pointer is automatically reset to the first element of the array.

Right... this seems to suggest that foreach relies on the array pointer of the source array. But we've just proved that we're not working with the source array, right? Well, not entirely.

Test case 3:

// Move the array pointer on one to make sure it doesn't affect the loop
var_dump(each($array));

foreach ($array as $item) {
  echo "$item\n";
}

var_dump(each($array));

/* Output
  array(4) {
    [1]=>
    int(1)
    ["value"]=>
    int(1)
    [0]=>
    int(0)
    ["key"]=>
    int(0)
  }
  1
  2
  3
  4
  5
  bool(false)
*/

So, despite the fact that we are not working directly with the source array, we are working directly with the source array pointer - the fact that the pointer is at the end of the array at the end of the loop shows this. Except this can't be true - if it was, then test case 1 would loop forever.

The PHP manual also states:

As foreach relies on the internal array pointer changing it within the loop may lead to unexpected behavior.

Well, let's find out what that "unexpected behavior" is (technically, any behavior is unexpected since I no longer know what to expect).

Test case 4:

foreach ($array as $key => $item) {
  echo "$item\n";
  each($array);
}

/* Output: 1 2 3 4 5 */

Test case 5:

foreach ($array as $key => $item) {
  echo "$item\n";
  reset($array);
}

/* Output: 1 2 3 4 5 */

...nothing that unexpected there, in fact it seems to support the "copy of source" theory.


The Question

What is going on here? My C-fu is not good enough for me to able to extract a proper conclusion simply by looking at the PHP source code, I would appreciate it if someone could translate it into English for me.

It seems to me that foreach works with a copy of the array, but sets the array pointer of the source array to the end of the array after the loop.

  • Is this correct and the whole story?
  • If not, what is it really doing?
  • Is there any situation where using functions that adjust the array pointer (each(), reset() et al.) during a foreach could affect the outcome of the loop?
share|improve this question
2  
@DaveRandom There's a php-internals tag this should probably go with, but I'll leave it to you to decide which if any of the other 5 tags to replace. –  Michael Berkowski Apr 7 '12 at 19:40
3  
looks like COW, without delete handle –  eicto Apr 7 '12 at 19:43
26  
At first I thought »gosh, another newbie question. Read the docs… hm, clearly undefined behavior«. Then I read the complete question, and I must say: I like it. You've put quite some effort in it and writing all the testcases. ps. are testcase 4 and 5 the same? –  knittl Apr 7 '12 at 19:49
9  
Just a thought about why it does make sense that the array pointer gets touched: PHP needs to reset and move the internal array pointer of the original array along with the copy, because the user may ask for a reference to the current value (foreach ($array as &$value)) - PHP needs to know the current position in the original array even though it's actually iterating over a copy. –  Niko Apr 7 '12 at 20:49
7  
The answer to this question is in the accepted answer to the question you linked to. In particular, where the internal pointer is pointing for any iteration in foreach. –  monocell Apr 15 at 8:56
show 12 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 661 down vote accepted

Note: This answer assumes that you have some basic knowledge about how zvals work in PHP, in particular you should know what a refcount is and what is_ref means.

foreach works with all kinds of traversables, i.e. with arrays, with plain objects (where the accessible properties are traversed) and Traversable objects (or rather objects that define the internal get_iterator handler). This answer will mainly focus on arrays, I'll just mention the others at the end.

But before getting into that some background on arrays and their iteration that is important in this context:

Background on array iteration

Arrays in PHP are ordered hashtables (i.e. the hash buckets are part of a doubly linked list) and foreach will traverse the array according to that order.

PHP internally has two mechanisms to traverse an array: The first one is the internal array pointer. This pointer is part of the HashTable structure and is basically just a pointer to the current hashtable Bucket. The internal array pointer is safe against modification, i.e. if the current Bucket is removed, then the internal array pointer will be updated to point to the next bucket.

The second iteration mechanism is an external array pointer, called HashPosition. This is basically the same as the internal array pointer, but not stored in the HashTable itself. This external iteration mechanism is not safe against modification. If you remove the bucket that the HashPosition currently points to, then you'll leave behind a dangling pointer, leading to a segmentation fault.

As such external array pointers can only be used when you are absolutely, positively sure that during the iteration no user code will be executed. And user code can be run through a lot of ways, e.g. in an error handler, a cast or a zval destruction. That's why in most cases PHP has to use the internal array pointer instead of an external one. If it would not PHP could segfault when the user started doing weird things.

The issue with the internal array pointer is that it is part of the HashTable. So when you modify it, you are modifying the HashTable and as such the array. And as PHP arrays have by-value (rather than by-reference) semantics that means you need to copy the array whenever you want to iterate an array.

A simple example of why the copying really is necessary (and not just some puristic concern) is a nested iteration:

foreach ($array as $a) {
    foreach ($array as $b) {
        // ...
    }
}

Here you want both loops to be independent and not share the same array pointer in some weird way.

And this leads us to foreach:

Array iteration in foreach

Now you know why foreach has to perform an array copy before traversing the array. But that's obviously not the whole story. Whether or not PHP will actually do the copy depends on a few factors:

  • If the iterated array is a reference, then the copy will not happen, instead only an addref will be done:

    $ref =& $array; // $array has is_ref=1 now
    foreach ($array as $val) {
        // ...
    }
    

    Why? Because any change of the array should also propagate to the reference, including the internal array pointer. If foreach did a copy in this case it would break reference semantics.

  • If the array has a refcount of 1, the copy will not be done either. refcount=1 means that the array isn't used anywhere else so foreach can use it directly. If the refcount is higher than 1, it means that the array is shared with other variables and in order to avoid modification foreach has to copy it (apart from the reference case mentioned above).

  • If the array is iterated by-reference (foreach ($array as &$ref)), then - apart from the copy/no-copy behavior from above - the array will be made a reference afterwards.

So this is the first part of the mystery: the copying behavior. The second part is how the actual iteration is done, which is also a bit odd. The "usual" iteration pattern that you know (and that is also usually used in PHP - apart from foreach) is something like this (pseudocode):

reset();
while (get_current_data(&data) == SUCCESS) {
    code();
    move_forward();
}

foreach iteration looks a tiny bit different:

reset();
while (get_current_data(&data) == SUCCESS) {
    move_forward();
    code();
}

The difference is that move_forward() is not called at the end of one cycle, but at the beginning. So when your userland code is working on the element $i, then the internal array pointer is already at element $i+1.

This behavior of foreach is also the reason why the internal array pointer is set to the next bucket if the current one is removed, rather than the previous one (as you would expect). It's done so it works nicely with foreach (but it obviously won't work nicely with everything else and will skip array elements in that case).

Implications for code

The first implication of the behavior described above is that foreach has to copy the array it iterates in many cases (slow). But fear not: I actually tried out removing the requirement to copy it and I couldn't really see a performance difference in anything but artificial benchmarks (in those iteration got two times faster). Seems like people aren't iterating enough :P

The second implication is that usually there shouldn't be any implications. The foreach behavior is usually rather transparent to the user and just works as it should do. You don't need to worry about if and how a copy has been made and just when exactly a pointer is advanced.

The third implication is - and now we're getting to your problems - that sometimes you do get to see some very weird and hard to understand behavior. This happens in particular when you try to modify the array within the foreach.

A large collection of various edge-case behaviors that occur when you modify an array during iteration can be found in the PHP testsuite. Starting with this test and then incrementing the number 012 to 013 etc you can see how foreach will behave in various situations (different combinations of references etc).

But now to your actual examples:

  • Test case 1: Here $array has refcount=1 before the loop, so it won't be copied, but it'll get an addref. Once you do the $array[] the zval will be separated, so the array that you are pushing the elements to and the one in the iteration will be different ones.

  • Test case 2: Here the same applies as in test case 1.

  • Test case 3: Again, same story. At the foreach loop you have refcount=1, so you only get an addref and as such the internal pointer of $array will be modified. So at the end of the loop the pointer is NULL (meaning iteration done). each indicated this by returning false.

  • Test cases 4 and 5: Both each and reset are by-reference functions. The $array has a refcount=2 when it is passed to them, so it has to be separated. So here again foreach will be working on a separate array.

But those test cases are lame. The behavior only starts to get really unintuitive when you use a function like current in the loop:

foreach ($array as $val) {
    var_dump(current($array));
}
/* Output: 2 2 2 2 2 */

Here you should know that current is also a by-ref function, even though it does not modify the array. It has to be in order to play nice with all the other functions like next which are all by-ref. (current is actually a prefer-ref function. It can also take a value, but will use a ref if it can.) Reference means that the array has to be separated and $array and the foreach-array will be different. The reason you get 2 instead of 1 is also mentioned above: foreach advances the array pointer before running the user code, not after. So even though the code is at the first element, foreach already advanced the pointer to the second.

Now lets try a small modification:

$ref = &$array;
foreach ($array as $val) {
    var_dump(current($array));
}
/* Output: 2 3 4 5 false */

Here we have the is_ref=1 case, so the array is not copied (just like above). But now that it is_ref the array has no longer to be separated when passing to the by-ref current function. So now current and foreach work on the same array. You still see the off-by-one behavior though, due to the way foreach advances the pointer.

You get the same behavior when doing by-ref iteration:

foreach ($array as &$val) {
    var_dump(current($array));
}
/* Output: 2 3 4 5 false */

Here the important part is that foreach will make $array an is_ref=1 when it is iterated by reference, so basically you have the same situation as above.

Another small variation, this time we'll assign the array to another variable:

$foo = $array;
foreach ($array as $val) {
    var_dump(current($array));
}
/* Output: 1 1 1 1 1 */

Here the refcount of the $array is 2 when the loop is started, so for once we actually have to do the copy upfront. Thus $array and the array used by foreach will be completely separate from the starts. That's why you get the position of the internal array pointer wherever it was before the loop (in this case it was at the first position).

Iteration of objects

When an object is iterated there are two cases:

a) The object is not Traversable (or rather: Does not specify the internal get_iterator handler). In this case the iteration happens very similar to arrays. The same copying semantics apply. The only real difference is that foreach will run some additional code to skip properties that are not visible from the current scope. A few more random facts:

  • For declared properties PHP optimizes the property hashtable away. If you are iterating over an object though it has to reconstruct this hashtable (increasing memory usage). [Not that this should bother you, just a bit of trivia]

  • The hashtable for the properties is refetched on every iteration, i.e. PHP will call the get_properties handler again and again and again. For "normal" properties this makes little difference, but if the properties are dynamically created in the handler (this is something internal classes quite commonly do) then it means that the properties table will be recomputed every time.

b) The object is Traversable. In this case pretty much all what has been said above does not apply in any way. In this case PHP will not do copying and it will also not do any "advance pointer before loop already" tricks. I think that the iteration behavior on Traversables is a lot more predictable and doesn't really require explanation :)

Substituting the iterated entity during the loop

Another odd case that I didn't mention yet is that PHP allows you to substitute the iterated entity during the loop. So you can start iterating on one array and then replace it with another array halfway through. Or start iterating on an array and then replace it with an object:

$arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
$obj = (object) [6, 7, 8, 9, 10];

$ref =& $arr;
foreach ($ref as $val) {
    echo "$val\n";
    if ($val == 3) {
        $ref = $obj;
    }
}
/* Output: 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 */

As you can see in this case PHP will just start iterating the other entity from the start once the substitution has happened.

Changing the internal array pointer during iteration

One last detail of the foreach behavior that I did not yet mention (because it can be used to get really weird behavior) is what happens when you try to change the internal array pointer during iteration.

It may not do what you expect: When you call next or prev in the loop body (in the by-ref case) you can see that the internal array pointer is moved, but it will still not change the iteration behavior. The reason is that foreach will back up the current position and the hash of the current element into a HashPointer after every iteration. On the next iteration foreach will check whether the internal position changed and try to restore it back to the old element (based on the hash).

Let's see what "try" means with a few examples. First, here is an example that shows how a change of the internal pointer does not change the foreach behavior:

$array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
$ref =& $array;
foreach ($array as $value) {
    var_dump($value);
    reset($array);
}
// output: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Now lets unset the element that foreach will be at on the first iteration (key 1):

$array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
$ref =& $array;
foreach ($array as $value) {
    var_dump($value);
    unset($array[1]);
    reset($array);
}
// output: 1, 1, 3, 4, 5

You can see that the reset happened this time (double 1) because the element with the backed up hash was removed.

Now remember that a hash is just that: A hash. I.e. it has collisions. So, let's first try the following snippet:

$array = ['EzEz' => 1, 'EzFY' => 2, 'FYEz' => 3];
$ref =& $array;
foreach ($array as $value) {
    unset($array['EzFY']);
    $array['FYFZ'] = 4;
    reset($array);
    var_dump($value);
}
// output: 1 1 3 4

This behaves as expected. We removed the EzFY key (where foreach currently was), so the reset happens. Also we set an additional key, so the 4 is added at the end of the iteration.

But now comes the odd part. What happens if we set the FYFY key instead of FYFZ? Lets try:

$array = ['EzEz' => 1, 'EzFY' => 2, 'FYEz' => 3];
$ref =& $array;
foreach ($array as $value) {
    unset($array['EzFY']);
    $array['FYFY'] = 4;
    reset($array);
    var_dump($value);
}
// output: 1 4

Now the loop went directly to the new element, skipping everything else. The reason is that the FYFY key collides with EzFY (actually all keys in that array collide). Furthermore the Bucket for FYFY happens to be at the same memory address as the Bucket of EzFY that was just dropped. So for PHP it will look like it is still the same position, with the same hash. So the position is "restored" to it, thus jumping to the end of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
+Nice .. this this not resolve why it acts differently with functions 3v4l.org/1aUpd –  Baba Feb 13 '13 at 14:03
4  
@Baba It does. Passing it to a function is the same as doing $foo = $array before the loop ;) –  NikiC Feb 13 '13 at 14:25
12  
For those of you who don't know what a zval is, please refer to Sara Goleman's blog.golemon.com/2007/01/youre-being-lied-to.html –  shu zOMG chen Feb 27 '13 at 22:30
1  
Minor correction: what you call Bucket isn't what is normally called Bucket in a hashtable. Normally Bucket is a set of entries with the same hash%size. You seem to use it for what is normally called an entry. Linked list isn't on buckets, but on entries. –  unbeli Mar 1 '13 at 9:36
5  
@unbeli I'm using the terminology used internally by PHP. The Buckets are part of a doubly linked list for hash collisions and also part of a doubly linked list for order ;) –  NikiC Mar 1 '13 at 14:47
show 6 more comments

Some points to note when working with foreach():

a) foreach works on the prospected copy of the original array. It means foreach() will have SHARED data storage until or unless a prospected copy is not created foreach Notes/User comments.

b) What triggers a prospected copy? Prospected copy is created based on the policy of copy-on-write, that is, whenever an array passed to foreach() is changed, a clone of original array is created.

c) The original array and foreach() iterator will have DISTINCT SENTINEL VARIABLES, that is, one for the original array and other for foreach; see the test code below. SPL , Iterators, and Array Iterator.

Stack Overflow question How to make sure the value is reset in a 'foreach' loop in PHP? addresses the cases (3,4,5) of your question.

The following example show that each() and reset() DOES NOT affect SENTINEL variables (for example, the current index variable) of the foreach() iterator.

$array = array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

list($key2, $val2) = each($array);
echo "each() Original (outside): $key2 => $val2<br/>";

foreach($array as $key => $val){
    echo "foreach: $key => $val<br/>";

    list($key2,$val2) = each($array);
    echo "each() Original(inside): $key2 => $val2<br/>";

    echo "--------Iteration--------<br/>";
    if ($key == 3){
        echo "Resetting original array pointer<br/>";
        reset($array);
    }
}

list($key2, $val2) = each($array);
echo "each() Original (outside): $key2 => $val2<br/>";

Output:

each() Original (outside): 0 => 1
foreach: 0 => 1
each() Original(inside): 1 => 2
--------Iteration--------
foreach: 1 => 2
each() Original(inside): 2 => 3
--------Iteration--------
foreach: 2 => 3
each() Original(inside): 3 => 4
--------Iteration--------
foreach: 3 => 4
each() Original(inside): 4 => 5
--------Iteration--------
Resetting original array pointer
foreach: 4 => 5
each() Original(inside): 0=>1
--------Iteration--------
each() Original (outside): 1 => 2
share|improve this answer
1  
Your answer is not quite correct. foreach operates on a potential copy of the array, but it does not make the actual copy unless it is needed. –  linepogl Apr 8 '12 at 6:34
    
would you like to demonstrate how and when that potential copy is created through code ? My code demonstrates that foreach is copying the array 100% of the time. I am eager to know. Thanks for you comments –  sakhunzai Apr 8 '12 at 16:05
    
Copying an array costs a lot. Try counting the time it takes to iterate an array with 100000 elements using either for or foreach. You will not see any significant difference between the two of them, because an actual copy does not take place. –  linepogl Apr 9 '12 at 18:46
    
Then I would assume that there is SHARED data storage reserved until or unless copy-on-write , but (from my code snippet) its evident that there will always be TWO set of SENTINEL variables one for the original array and other for foreach. Thanks that makes sense –  sakhunzai Apr 9 '12 at 19:44
    
"prospected"? Do you mean "protected"? –  Peter Mortensen Apr 15 at 15:28
show 1 more comment

In example 3 you don't modify the array. In all other examples you modify either the contents or the internal array pointer. This is important when it comes to PHP arrays because of the semantics of the assignment operator.

The assignment operator for the arrays in PHP works more like a lazy clone. Assigning one variable to another that contains an array will clone the array, unlike most languages. However, the actual cloning will not be done unless it is needed. This means that the clone will take place only when either of the variables is modified (copy-on-write).

Here is an example:

$a = array(1,2,3);
$b = $a;  // This is lazy cloning of $a. For the time
          // being $a and $b point to the same internal
          // data structure.

$a[] = 3; // Here $a changes, which triggers the actual
          // cloning. From now on, $a and $b are two
          // different data structures. The same would
          // happen if there were a change in $b.

Coming back to your test cases, you can easily imagine that foreach creates some kind of iterator with a reference to the array. This reference works exactly like the variable $b in my example. However, the iterator along with the reference live only during the loop and then, they are both discarded. Now you can see that, in all cases but 3, the array is modified during the loop, while this extra reference is alive. This triggers a clone, and that explains what's going on here!

Here is an excellent article for another side effect of this copy-on-write behaviour: The PHP Ternary Operator: Fast or not?

share|improve this answer
    
seems your right, I made some example which demonstrate that: codepad.org/OCjtvu8r one difference from your example - it does not copy if you change value, only if change keys. –  eicto Apr 7 '12 at 21:35
    
This does indeed explain all the behavior show above, and it can be nicely illustrated by calling each() at the end of the first test case, where we see that the array pointer of the original array points to the second element, since the array was modified during the first iteration. This also seems to demonstrate that foreach moves the array pointer on before executing the code block of the loop, which I was not expecting - I would have thought it would do this at the end. Many thanks, this clears it up for me nicely. –  DaveRandom Apr 8 '12 at 15:59
add comment

As per the documentation provided by PHP manual.

On each iteration, the value of the current element is assigned to $v and the internal
array pointer is advanced by one (so on the next iteration, you'll be looking at the next element).

So as per your first example:

$array = ['foo'=>1];
foreach($array as $k=>&$v)
{
   $array['bar']=2;
   echo($v);
}

$array have only single element, so as per the foreach execution, 1 assign to $v and it don't have any other element to move pointer

But in your second example:

$array = ['foo'=>1, 'bar'=>2];
foreach($array as $k=>&$v)
{
   $array['baz']=3;
   echo($v);
}

$array have two element, so now $array evaluate the zero indices and move the pointer by one. For first iteration of loop, added $array['baz']=3; as pass by reference.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Explanation (quote from php.net):

The first form loops over the array given by array_expression. On each iteration, the value of the current element is assigned to $value and the internal array pointer is advanced by one (so on the next iteration, you'll be looking at the next element).

So, in your first example you only have one element in the array, and when the pointer is moved the next element does not exist, so after you add new element foreach ends because it already "decided" that it it as the last element.

In your second example, you start with two elements, and foreach loop is not at the last element so it evaluates the array on the next iteration and thus realises that there is new element in the array.

I believe that this is all consequence of On each iteration part of the explanation in the documentation, which probably means that foreach does all logic before it calls the code in {}.

Test case

If you run this:

<?
    $array = Array(
        'foo' => 1,
        'bar' => 2
    );
    foreach($array as $k=>&$v) {
        $array['baz']=3;
        echo $v." ";
    }
    print_r($array);
?>

You will get this output:

1 2 3 Array
(
    [foo] => 1
    [bar] => 2
    [baz] => 3
)

Which means that it accepted the modification and went through it because it was modified "in time". But if you do this:

<?
    $array = Array(
        'foo' => 1,
        'bar' => 2
    );
    foreach($array as $k=>&$v) {
        if ($k=='bar') {
            $array['baz']=3;
        }
        echo $v." ";
    }
    print_r($array);
?>

You will get:

1 2 Array
(
    [foo] => 1
    [bar] => 2
    [baz] => 3
)

Which means that array was modified, but since we modified it when the foreach already was at the last element of the array, it "decided" not to loop anymore, and even though we added new element, we added it "too late" and it was not looped through.

Detailed explanation can be read at How foreach actually works which explains the internals behind this behaviour.

share|improve this answer
7  
Well did you read the rest of the answer? It makes perfect sense that foreach decides if it will loop another time before it even runs the code in it. –  DKasipovic Apr 15 at 8:49
2  
No, the array is modified, but "too late" since foreach already "thinks" that it is at the last element (which it is at the start of iteration) and will not loop anymore. Where in the second example, it is not at the last element at the start of iteration and evaluates again on the start of next iteration. I am trying to prepare a test case. –  DKasipovic Apr 15 at 8:55
1  
@AlmaDo Look at lxr.php.net/xref/PHP_TRUNK/Zend/zend_vm_def.h#4509 It's always set to the next pointer when it iterates. So, when it reaches the last iteration, it'll be marked as finished (via NULL pointer). When you then add a key in last iteration, foreach won't notice it. –  bwoebi Apr 15 at 9:21
1  
@DKasipovic no. There is no complete & clear explanation there (at least for now - may be I'm wrong) –  Alma Do Apr 15 at 9:25
4  
Actually it seems that @AlmaDo has a flaw in understanding his own logic… Your answer is fine. –  bwoebi Apr 15 at 9:36
show 4 more comments

protected by Baba Feb 28 '13 at 9:10

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.