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I have the following formatted sample string:

== header == information about things ==headeragain== info can have characters like.*?{=

etc on just one line.

I want to parse this in to a hash such that the keys are the "==.+?==" and the values are the info after the keys. I've tried a couple of regular expressions to globally match these pairs:

%hash = $string =~ /(==.+?==)(.+)/g

and

%hash = $string =~ /(==.+?==)(.+?)/g

Will match the first key and then everything else as its value, and match just the keys respectively.

%hash = $string =~ /(==.+?==)(.+(?===.+?==))/g

is supposed to look ahead for the next key, but not "eat it up" as I understand it. However, it will only match the first pair and go no further.

I think this problem has come from a misunderstanding of how the global modifier acts. Do I need to tweak something in one of my expressions? Or do I need to be doing something completely different?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Even though you're using non-greedy modifier, there's no limitation for 2nd subgroup in you 2nd example.

Add positive look-ahead: (?=$|==) after value. Here (?= is a declaration of look-ahead block and $ or == is a substring, you're searching for.

I.e. the solution is: /(==.+?==)(.+?)(?=$|==)/g

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Thanks, the lookahead for "$" to get last pair is what I needed! A little silly of me. –  Mattrition Apr 7 '12 at 20:59
while ($line =~ /
   == \s*
   ( .+? )
   \s* == \s*
   ( .*? )
   (?= \s* (?: == | \z ) )
/xg) {
   my $key = $1;
   my $val = $2;
   ...
}

But I dislike using the "?" quantifier modifier. It doesn't actually prevent the wrong thing from being matched when given wrong or unexpected input. So I'd use:

while ($line =~ /
   == \s*
   ( \S (?: (?! \s* == ). )* )
   \s* == \s*
   ( (?: (?! \s* == ). )* )
/xg) {
   my $key = $1;
   my $val = $2;
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
(?:(?!PAT).)* is to PAT as [^CLASSES] is to [CLASSES]. –  ikegami Apr 8 '12 at 1:13

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