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I had a script that was doing segfault and I'm not really comfortable the way I resolved it so I wanted to post the question here to understand a little bit more about the cause of it, and maybe a better solution.

Here's what my script does (removed some detailed code to leave the "core" of it):

# Here's a query I need to do every X seconds to monitor progress of other tasks
# This is apparently the key to my segfault problem
my $stmt = $dbh->prepare($query);

my $all_done = 0;
while(!$all_done) {
    $self->debug("Waiting for $n blocker tasks to be finished");

    # Execute query to pull the status of the tasks from DB
    $stmt->execute();

    my $pending = [];
    while(my $hr = $stmt->fetchrow_hashref()) { 
        push @{$pending}, $hr->{'TASK_NAME'} if ($hr->{'STATUS'} ne 'COMPLETE'); 
    }

    if(scalar(@{$pending}) > 0) {
        $all_done = 0;
        sleep($sleep_gap);
    }
    else { $all_done = 1; }
}

Now, the script works well, most of the time. However, it goes to segfault when 3 or more instances of the script are running in parallel (same script, separate processes, not threads).

How did I solve it? I solved it by doing the DBH::prepare call every time during the while(!$all_done) loop.

So, this code does NOT segfault, even with several processes running in parallel. I reproduced the error several times, consistently, and then I did the same with the new code. I'm positive that moving the statement inside the loop FIXED the problem.

Any ideas why this may be happening?

I'm using perl 5.8 and perl-DBI version 1.609.

Here's also the output of strace when the script segfaults:

read(5, "\1\7\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\20\27\234\312\272\221eG2;\33S\364\230\313\220\221Bxp\4\7"..., 2064) = 263
write(4, "\1\31\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\21i \1\1\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\3^!)\4\4\0\0\0\0"..., 281) = 281
read(4, "\0\177\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\v\5\2\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0  \10\6"..., 2064) = 127
write(2, "debug:Waiting for 1 blocker task"..., 49debug:Waiting for 1 blocker tasks to be finished
) = 49
write(5, "\0\252\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\3^\20p\200\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\r\0\0\0\0"..., 170) = 170
read(5, "\0\301\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\6\"\2\0\0\0@\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\7 ru"..., 2064) = 193
write(5, "\1]\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\3^\21)\200\0\0\0\0\0\0\1\234\0\0\0\1\r\0\0\0\0"..., 349) = 349
read(5, "\0y\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\10\6\0S\254b\f\0\t\0\0\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0"..., 2064) = 121
write(5, "\0000\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\3h\22\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"..., 48) = 48
read(5, "\0\26\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\10\2\0\0\0\t\5\0\0\0\21\0", 2064) = 22
time(NULL)                              = 1333827285
rt_sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, [CHLD], [], 8) = 0
rt_sigaction(SIGCHLD, NULL, {SIG_DFL}, 8) = 0
rt_sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, [], NULL, 8) = 0
nanosleep({10, 0}, {10, 0})             = 0
time(NULL)                              = 1333827295
write(4, "\1\31\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\21i\"\1\1\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\3^#)\4\4\0\0\0\0"..., 281) = 281
read(4, "\0\177\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\v\5\2\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0  \10\6"..., 2064) = 127
write(2, "debug:Waiting for 1 blocker task"..., 49debug:Waiting for 1 blocker tasks to be finished
) = 49
write(5, "\0)\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\21i\23\1\1\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\3N\24\2\0\0\0@\0\0"..., 41) = 41
read(5, "\1>\0\0\6\0\0\0\0\0\20\27\234\312\272\221eG2;\33S\364\230\313\220\221Bxp\4\7"..., 2064) = 318
--- SIGSEGV (Segmentation fault) @ 0 (0) ---
+++ killed by SIGSEGV +++
[ Process PID=22767 runs in 32 bit mode. ]
share|improve this question
    
Just to add to my post, in case it wasn't clear enough: Doing "prepare()" only one time and then multiple "execute()" calls should be the right way to do it, but that way I get segfaults. On the other hand, by doing prepare() and execute() all the time I avoid the segfault. –  juansaba Apr 7 '12 at 20:41
    
Are the DBH created in the thread in which they are used? –  ikegami Apr 7 '12 at 20:49
    
When you say "multiple instances" did the script fork or were the instances started independently? –  cjm Apr 8 '12 at 0:08
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1 Answer

I'd say you don't have much to worry about since SQLite statement prepare tends to be fast. I mesured that a simple SQL prepare via Perl DBI took only 20 microseconds (see results and code below). Considering your application you shouldn't notice any difference in performance.

As SQLite's classic locking allows only one writer and multiple readers at a time the issue you are facing can be related to locking or transaction handling. However SIGSEGV is never the expected behvior.

Results

Perl 5.014002
DBI 1.618
SQLite 3.7.9
time in s for 100000 prepares: 2.01810789108276
ys per prepare: 20.1810789108276

Code

use DBI;
use Time::HiRes qw ( time );
use strict;
use warnings;

my $dbc = DBI->connect (
 'dbi:SQLite:dbname=/tmp/test.db',
  undef, undef, { AutoCommit => 0, RaiseError => 1, PrintError => 1 }
) || die $DBI::errstr;

print "Perl $]\n";
print "DBI $DBI::VERSION\n";
print "SQLite $dbc->{sqlite_version}\n";

my $start = time();

my $n = 100_000;

foreach ( 1 .. $n ) {

 my $stmt = $dbc->prepare( qq{
  select count(*) from sec where sid is not null
 } );

}

my $end = time();

print
 "time in s for $n prepares: " .
 ( $end - $start ) .
 "\n";

print
 "ys per prepare: " .
 ( ( ( $end - $start ) * 1_000_000 ) / $n ) .
 "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you think the underlying db is SQLite? –  mob Apr 9 '12 at 15:38
    
Now that I have read the question again it doesn't really indicate what the db is. I assume that it might have been a guess or maybe I was just browsing SQLite related questions right before answering. –  XDF Apr 17 '12 at 15:43
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