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in my java class we were learning about arrays and this question came up. I have tried to solve it and can't seem to fulfill the requirements. I can read in the user inputs and have it limited to only 5 elements (one of the other requirements), also the values have to be between 10 and 100 I have also done that. But I cannot seem to "not print" the duplicate values. The array accepts the duplicate values. They don't have to be taken out, just not printed. Here is my code so far:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class ArrayTest {

static Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int size = 5;
    int InpNum[] = new int[size];

    for (int i = 0; i < InpNum.length; i++){

    while (InpNum[i] <= i){

        System.out.println("Please type a number between 10 and 100: ");
        InpNum[i] = in.nextInt();

        while (InpNum[i] < 10 || InpNum[i] > 100){
            System.out.println("Error: Please type an integer between 10 and 100: ");
            InpNum[i] = in.nextInt();
        }

        Arrays.sort(InpNum);

        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(InpNum));

        }

        while (Search(InpNum, i) == true){
            System.out.println("ERROR: Please enter a number that is not a duplicate of the other numbers you have entered");
            InpNum[i] = in.nextInt();
        }

    }

}

// I can't seem to implement the method below in a useful manner.

    public static boolean Search(int InpNum[], int searchedNum) {

    for(int i : InpNum) {

        if (i == searchedNum) {

            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}
}   
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would consider restructuring your application.

Instead of placing the number the user inputs into the array immediately, store it in a local variable. Then run all the checks you need to run, and add it to the array only if it passes all of them.

You should only have one while loop in the whole program (the outer one). All those others are greatly confusing the issue and making the problem much harder than it has to be.

So, in psudo-code:

int index = 0;
while (true)
{
  int num = in.nextInt();

  // if not between 10 and 100, continue
  // if it would make the array larger than 5, continue
  //    (or perhaps break out of the loop, since we've filled the array)
  // if it is already in the array, continue

  // all the checks passed, so add it to the array!
  InpNum[index++] = num;
}

As a side note, what you really need is a Set. This is a collection which is guaranteed to have no duplicates and allows you to answer the question "do I contain this value?" in an efficient manner using the method Set.contains( Object ).

So I would create a TreeSet or HashSet and put every number the user types into it. Your Search function would then simply be a one liner calling contains( searchedNum ) on your set.

share|improve this answer
    
They are studing about arrays that's why he/she wants to solve the "problem" with an array I think. But you have right this problem is screaming for Set :) –  dexametason Apr 7 '12 at 20:56
    
@dexametason I agree, there are larger issues with the basic way Kvote has structured his/her logic. I've adjusted my answer to be more helpful to the problem at hand. –  ulmangt Apr 7 '12 at 20:58
    
My logic was flawed, I simplified the code to have a single while loop and have the conditional check first, thank you!! I did try to use the Set class but the program had errors so I stuck with having the conditional checks first and having the print after thanks ulmangt! –  Kvote Apr 8 '12 at 2:01

A lazy way is to just create a second array that can hold the values as you go.

Loop through the input array and put the current element into the new array IF that array doesn't have that element already. Then replace the old array with the weened out one.

share|improve this answer

Easiest way
So what I do is first ask the number. Then save the number in a variable before entering it inside the array. Then I check if that number is already in it wih search. If it is I ask for a new number. If it is not I check if it is between 10 and 100, if it is not I ask for a new. I fit is I enter It inside the array. I have to check where an empty place is because the sort mixes up the array everytime

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class ArrayTest
{

static Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int size = 5;
   int InpNum[] = new int[size];

   for (int i = 0; i < InpNum.length; i++){
       System.out.println("Please type a number between 10 and 100: ");
       int number = in.nextInt();
    //while (InpNum[i] <= i){
        while (Search(InpNum, number) == true){
            System.out.println("ERROR: Please enter a number that is not a duplicate of the other numbers you have entered");
            number = in.nextInt();
      }



       while (number < 10 || number > 100){
        System.out.println("Error: Please type an integer between 10 and 100: ");
        number = in.nextInt();
       }

       int counter = 0;
       for (int j = 0; j < InpNum.length && counter == 0; j++){
          if(InpNum[j] == 0){
             InpNum[j] = number;
             counter++;
          }

      }
       Arrays.sort(InpNum);

       System.out.println(Arrays.toString(InpNum));

       //}



   }

 }

 // I can't seem to implement the method below in a useful manner.

   public static boolean Search(int InpNum[], int searchedNum) {

     for (int i = 0; i < InpNum.length; i++){

       if (InpNum[i] == searchedNum) {

        return true;
       }
   } 

   return false;
  }
  }   
share|improve this answer
    
why don't you explain yourself a bit? –  UmNyobe Apr 7 '12 at 21:04
    
Definitely a working fix, however I'd generally avoid simply providing the solution for questions tagged as Homework. –  ulmangt Apr 7 '12 at 21:05
    
Ok I edited beacause I forgot the sorting would mix up adding the number. –  David Maes Apr 7 '12 at 21:16
    
So what I do is first ask the number. Then save the number in a variable before entering it inside the variable. Then I check if that number is already in it wih search. If it is I ask for a new number. If it is not I check if it is between 10 and 100, if it is not I ask for a new. I fit is I enter It inside the array. I have to check where an empty place is because the sort mixes up the array everytime. –  David Maes Apr 7 '12 at 21:18
    
Also ok maybe you're right that I shouldn't have given the anwser just like that. But I know for little things like this sometimes hours can go by. Small mistakes take up a lot of time. –  David Maes Apr 7 '12 at 21:21

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