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I'm trying to write a code which stores strings in an array. I'm trying to do it with char* but I couldn't achieve. I search the net but couldn't find an answer. I've tried the code below, but it didn't compile.I use string stream because at some point I need to concatenate a string with an integer.

stringstream asd;
asd<<"my name is"<<5;
string s = asd.str();
char *s1 = s;
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2  
Don't use raw char * in C++ unless you absolutely have to. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 7 '12 at 20:46
1  
Where's the array? With the given code, the current answers (suggesting a call to c_str()) will fail terribly if the array outlives s. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 7 '12 at 20:48
    
"I'm trying to write a code which stores strings in an array"? Why? –  Johnsyweb Apr 7 '12 at 20:49
    
@Johnsyweb I will use that string if correspont array element called and I will print it –  user1305058 Apr 7 '12 at 20:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

> I'm trying to write a code which stores strings in an array.

Well, first you'll need an arary of strings. I don't like using naked arrays, so I use std::vector:

std::vector<std::string> myStrings;

But, I understand you have to use an array, so we'll use an array instead:

// I hope 20 is enough, but not too many.
std::string myStrings[20];
int j = 0;

> I use string stream because ...

Okay, we'll use stringstream:

std::stringstream s;
s << "Hello, Agent " << 99;
//myStrings.push_back(s.str()); // How *I* would have done it.
myStrings[j++] = s.str(); // How *you* have to do it.

That gets us one string, but you want an array of them:

for(int i = 3; i < 11; i+=2) {
  s.str(""); // clear out old value
  s << i << " is a" << (i==9?" very ":"n ") << "odd prime.";
  //myStrings.push_back(s.str());
  myStrings[j++] = s.str();
}

Now you have an array of strings.

Complete, tested program:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main () {
  // I hope 20 is enough, but not too many.
  std::string myStrings[20];
  int j = 0;

  std::stringstream s;
  s << "Hello, Agent " << 99;
  //myStrings.push_back(s.str()); // How *I* would have done it.
  myStrings[j++] = s.str(); // How *you* have to do it.

  for(int i = 3; i < 11; i+=2) {
    s.str(""); // clear out old value
    s << i << " is a" << (i==9?" very ":"n ") << "odd prime.";
    //myStrings.push_back(s.str());
    myStrings[j++] = s.str();
  }

  // Now we have an array of strings, what to do with them?
  // Let's print them.
  for(j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
    std::cout << myStrings[j] << "\n";
  }
}
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I need an dynamic array, like user enter 21th string, I should create a new array with the same name whose size is bigger. –  user1305058 Apr 7 '12 at 21:05
    
May I suggest that you get your program working with a fixed-size array first, then try to add dynamic arrays later. If (but only if) you don't figure out how dynamic arrays work on your own, come back and ask another question. –  Robᵩ Apr 7 '12 at 21:11
    
If you want a dynamic array use a vector as @Rob is showing you. –  Peter Wood Apr 7 '12 at 21:11
    
@Robᵩ I couldn't create an array kind of string a = new string[4]; –  user1305058 Apr 7 '12 at 21:13
1  
@user1305058. I'm not surprised that you can't create a dynamic array. That's why I suggest you get your program working first with a fixed-size array. Only after you have that much working perfectly, then replace your fixed-size array with a dynamic array. –  Robᵩ Apr 7 '12 at 21:18
char *s1 = s;

Is illegal. You either need:

const char *s1 = s.c_str();

if you're not set on char*, or you'll need to allocate a new char* and use strcpy to copy the contents from the string.

share|improve this answer

How about something like this?

vector<string> string_array;
stringstream asd;
asd<<"my name is"<<5;
string_array.push_back(asd.str());
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I'm not allowed to use a vector. –  user1305058 Apr 7 '12 at 20:50
    
You should put that in the question. Also, does that mean this is homework? You should tag it as such. –  Peter Wood Apr 7 '12 at 21:11

Just change your code to

char const* s1 = s.c_str();

because a pointer to char can't store a string object, only a pointer to char, which is what c_str() returns.

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Are you sure this will compile? –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 7 '12 at 20:47
    
c_str returns a const char*. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 7 '12 at 20:47
    
@LuchianGrigore Technically the pointer can point to the object, no? Although it is possible I'm too used to C# at this point. –  Shingetsu Apr 7 '12 at 20:49
    
@OliCharlesworth obviously, sry! :) –  Luchian Grigore Apr 7 '12 at 20:49
    
@Shingetsu a pointer can also point to 0x000000. It's not useful though. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 7 '12 at 20:50

I wouldn't use the char * directly. I would wrap it in something like the template below. You can override the operators you need to do any more operations (example, I would make data a private member, and override the operators to make the data print out cleanly). I did the assignment operator just to demonstrate how clean that could make code.

#include "MainWindow.h"

#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

template<size_t size>
class SaferChar
{
public:

  SaferChar & operator=(string const & other)
  {
    strncpy(data, other.c_str(), size);

    return *this;
  }

  char data[size];
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  SaferChar<10> safeChar;
  std::string String("Testing");


  safeChar = String.c_str();

  printf("%s\n", safeChar.data);

  return 0;
}
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