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Based on other similar questions I found I figure my problem has to do with indentation, but I've messed with it a lot and still can't figure it out. Thanks in advance

addBook = do
    putStrLn "Enter the title of the Book"
    tit <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the author of "++tit
    aut <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the year "++tit++" was published"
    yr <- getLine
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this may be relevant to others... I had the first line in the "do" with a tab indent and the rest with spaces :P –  Aram Kocharyan May 25 '12 at 5:14
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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

In your case it's not indentation; you really have finished your function with something that is not an expression. yr <- getLine — what did you expect to happen to yr, or for that matter aut, after this? They're just dangling, unused.

It may be clearer to show how this translates:

addBook = putStrLn "Enter the title of the Book" >>
          getLine >>= \tit ->
          putStrLn "Enter the author of "++ tit >>
          getLine >>= \aut ->
          putStrLn "Enter the year "++tit++" was published" >>
          getLine >>= \yr ->

So, what did you want to have following that last arrow?

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1  
Also, you might want to mention that getLine can be called without its result being bound, even if that is probably not what he intended. He might be under the mistaken impression that things with a return type other than () must be bound to a variable. –  Gabriel Gonzalez Apr 8 '12 at 18:09
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Think about the type of addBook. It's IO a where a is... nothing. That doesn't work. Your monad must have some result.

You might want to add something like this at the end:

return (tit, aut, yr)

Alternatively, if you don't want to have any useful result, return an empty tuple (a unit):

return ()
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awsome! Than you so much! –  user1319603 Apr 7 '12 at 21:11
5  
@user1319603: Mind you, return is unlike its counterparts in imperative languages. In Haskell, return is function like any other. It takes a value of some type a and wraps it into (in this case) value of type IO a. Before you learn about monads it's best to use this rule of thumb: last thing in do block must have type IO a for some type a. In your case, yr <- getLine would have type String and that's not allowed (indeed, having function of type IO a → a breaks lots of nice properties). –  Vitus Apr 7 '12 at 22:16
1  
@user1319603 You should upvote (click the up arrow for) every answer that helped you, and accept (click the check mark for) the answer that is the best or helped you the most. –  dave4420 Apr 8 '12 at 0:13
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If you take your code:

addBook = do
    putStrLn "Enter the title of the Book"
    tit <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the author of "++tit
    aut <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the year "++tit++" was published"
    yr <- getLine

and "translate" it to "normal" (non-do) notation (given p = putStrLn "..."):

addBook = 
    p >> getLine >>= (\tit ->
        p >> getLine >>= (\aut ->
            p >> getLine >>= (yr ->

You are ending up with (yr -> that doesn't make sense. If you don't have anything else useful to do, you can just return an empty tuple:

return ()

at the end:

addBook = do
    putStrLn "Enter the title of the Book"
    tit <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the author of "++tit
    aut <- getLine
    putStrLn "Enter the year "++tit++" was published"
    yr <- getLine
    return ()

You should probably ask yourself why you need to get aut and yr though.

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+1 for the explicit parentheses!!! ... perhaps return (tit,aut,yr) is also appropriate... Also, instead of yr <- getLine ; return () we can just write getLine - we choose which depending on what we want to "return". –  Will Ness Jun 11 at 19:06
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remove the last line since it's not an expression, then use parenthesis for the strings you pass to putStrLn.

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