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I have completed the assignment (yes it is for a programming class), but I am afraid I didn't go about it in the most efficient way possible. It is basically the uniq program, it will compare adjacent lines in a file and only print one copy of any repeated lines. A few notes: printUniq() is my own function that takes into account various flags, readline() is another function that reads a line of arbitrary length into a char * buffer using malloc and realloc. Here is the part I am worried about:

if(prevline != NULL)
{
  while(thisline != NULL)
  {
     while(thisline != NULL && strcmp(prevline, thisline) == 0)
     {
        count++;
        free(prevline);
        prevline = thisline;
        thisline = readline(stream);
     }
     printUniq(prevline, cflag, dflag, uflag, count);
     count = 1;
     free(prevline);
     if (thisline != NULL)
     {
        prevline = thisline;
        if((thisline = readline(stream)) == NULL)
        {
           printUniq(prevline, cflag, dflag, uflag, count);
        }
     }  
  }

Is there a better way to structure this program? I hate having to check thisline for NULL three times in a loop. The first NULL check in the outer while loop is necessary, and the next check in the nested while is needed in case the last lines are duplicates. The next check after the call to free basically checks if the "Duplicate loop" was exited because of thisline being null, and if not, it will allow the program to get another line. Then the next check is only there for the very last line in the file, because if it weren't there, when readline returns a null (there were no more lines in the file), the loop exits and the prevline was never printed.

Anyways, any help is appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I sugest to read the file in only one place, since it will make code more manageable. Maybe something like this might work:

prevline = NULL;
count = 1;
while ((thisline = readline(stream)) != NULL) // will stay in the loop for as long as it reads from file
{
    if (prevline == NULL)
    { // this is the first read from file
         prevline = thisline;
         continue;

    }

    if (strcmp(thisline, prevline) == 0)
    {
         count++;
    } else // found a different line
         if (count > 1) // but after I already counted several identical
         {    // so I will print the line
                printUniq(prevline, cflag, dflag, uflag, count);
                count = 1;
         }
    free(prevline);
    prevline = thisline;
}
if (count > 1) and (prevline != NULL)
{
     printUniq(prevline, cflag, dflag, uflag, count);
}
free(prevline);
share|improve this answer
    
I chose this answer because after reading gbulmer's answer, this is how I chose to implement it. Thanks for your help. –  ShuManChu Apr 7 '12 at 21:51
    
@ShuManChu - this contains a bug. It does not deal with the case of the last two or more lines of the file being the same. It silently ignores them. printUnique needs to be called after the main loop if prevline != NULL and count > 1. So I hope your code isn't the same. –  gbulmer Apr 8 '12 at 12:53
    
@Mihai - it has two syntax errors, missing ';' after free(prevline) and prevline = thisline –  gbulmer Apr 8 '12 at 13:13
    
@gbulmer: I edited my code based on your comments. You were right. I haven't seen those. –  Mihai Apr 10 '12 at 8:10

The suggestion by Mihai can be further simplified by using a for() loop instead of a while loop, and by using the continue statement (most of) the nested conditions and duplicated logic can be avoided:

dupstate = 0; uniqcount = 0; totdup = 0; linenum = 0;
for (prevline=NULL; thisline=readline(stream); free(prevline),prevline=thisline) {
{
    linenum++;
    if (!prevline || strcmp(thisline, prevline))
    {
         uniqcount++; dupstate = 0;
         printUniq(thisline, cflag, dflag, uflag, uniqcount);
         continue;
    }
    totdup++;

    if (!dupstate++) /* only the first dup is reported */
    {    
         printDup(thisline, cflag, dflag, uflag, totdup); 
    }
 }

 free(prevline);
share|improve this answer
    
you have the same error as Mihai. This fails in all cases where the last two or more lines of the file are repeated. So far, the OP hasn't mentioned printDup. What does that do? –  gbulmer Apr 8 '12 at 12:59
    
It was only intended to show that a different construction of the main loop can lead to a simpler program. Also note that I use thisline for the printfunction, where Mihai uses prevline. The loopbody will be executed exactly once for every line in the input. QED. –  wildplasser Apr 8 '12 at 13:45
    
I think we are going to disagree. IMHO either it works, so we can compare for simplicity, or it does not work, when comparison is not meaningful. The if... while ... does each line once too. IMHO that is not sufficient or necessary. When I talk about simplicity I am focusing on human cognitive measures. AFAICT, more than 50 viewers looked at this thread before I returned, and pointed out the error in Mihai's program. If that is an indicator of cognitive simplicity, IMHO we might infer that the algorithm is not obvious. Hey, ho:-) Hope you're having a lovely Easter holiday. –  gbulmer Apr 8 '12 at 14:22
    
I don't think that this is a simplification at all. Hiding a free call in the middle of the for loop start is evil at best. –  Frerich Raabe Apr 8 '12 at 18:25
    
WRT the free call: it seems weird, but it is the only place where it could belong, nothing is "hidden". The third "leg" of the for loop does the "shift-operation", this does involve a comma operator, but it keeps things where they belong, so be it. @gbulmer: do you think that the 50 human viewers have detected that Mihai's fragment printed prevline instead of thisline? –  wildplasser Apr 8 '12 at 22:35

Using (thisLine = readline()) != NULL as the condition of the loop, and only read one line at a time, would mean that the loop stopped at the end of the file, and the body of the loop could only be entered when thisLine is valid.

It could either read prevLine outside the loop, or deal with no previous line inside the loop:

if ((thisLine = readline()) != NULL) {
    char* prevLine = thisLine;                // got one line
    while ((thisLine = readline()) != NULL) {
       if (strcmp(...) == 0) {
           ...
       } else {
           ...
       }
       ...
    }
    ... deal with prev_line, no need for if because it *must* have been read.
}

vs

prevLine = NULL;
while ((thisLine = readline()) != NULL) {
    if (prevLine == NULL) { // first line?
       ...
    } else if (strcmp(...) == 0) {
       ...
    } else {
       ...
    }
       ...
    prev_line = this_line
}
if (prev_line != NULL) {
   ...
} else {          // only one line in the file?
   ...
}

Dealing with the one line outside the loop makes the the first approach simpler. The flow seems very clear to me. Is there one line? Is there a second line? Okay, uniqueness has meaning ...

In the second approach, dealing with one line inside the loop means the maintenance developer will be looking at the first-line test for every line of input, which IMHO is more for them to worry about.

Code after the loop is necessary because the last two or more lines of the file might be repeated, and that case needs to call printUnique too.

Also one-line-file logic is after the loop (which is less clear, IMHO) and would require mre logic. This logic is needed if the program is intended to emulate other uniq functionality like printing every line with a count.

The clear benefit of the second approach is reading the file in one place, which is in general a good tactic. IMHO, if readline is written properly, it doesn't matter much.

Summary: the first approach needs less logic, and the order of events is more explicit, hence it is simpler to understand. The second reads the file in one place, but needs the last repeating group to be handled outside the loop, so it is even longer. It is also more logic if uniq in general is being programmed.

Note: Both of these flows work.

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This was very helpful, I actually used the check you suggested for the while loop, and then a simple if else inside the loop for handling duplicates. –  ShuManChu Apr 7 '12 at 21:49
    
@ShuManChu - IMHO, one algorithm is clearly better than the other because it has less logic, and a simpler and more explicit flow of events. The main problem with the second approach is it does not work in the general case of uniq for one line files unless the code after the loop is added. For example, UNIX uniq will print all lines, with counts. –  gbulmer Apr 8 '12 at 11:08

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