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var content;
fs.readFile('./Index.html', function read(err, data) {
    if (err) {
        throw err;
    }
    content = data;
});
console.log(content);

Logs undefined, why?

share|improve this question
up vote 105 down vote accepted

To elaborate on what @Raynos said, the function you have defined is an asynchronous callback. It doesn't execute right away, rather it executes when the file loading has completed. When you call readFile, control is returned immediately and the next line of code is executed. So when you call console.log, your callback has not yet been invoked, and this content has not yet been set. Welcome to asynchronous programming.

Example approaches

var content;
// First I want to read the file
fs.readFile('./Index.html', function read(err, data) {
    if (err) {
        throw err;
    }
    content = data;

    // Invoke the next step here however you like
    console.log(content);   // Put all of the code here (not the best solution)
    processFile();          // Or put the next step in a function and invoke it
});

function processFile() {
    console.log(content);
}

Or better yet, as Raynos example shows, wrap your call in a function and pass in your own callbacks. (Apparently this is better practice) I think getting into the habit of wrapping your async calls in function that takes a callback will save you a lot of trouble and messy code.

function doSomething (callback) {
    // any async callback invokes callback with response
}

doSomething (function doSomethingAfter(err, result) {
    // process the async result
});
share|improve this answer
4  
Yes, you are right, thanks to you and Raynos. I should have used fs.readFileSync() instead which returns content. – karaxuna Apr 7 '12 at 22:27
1  
Then creators of nodejs should leave nodejs community because they created such functions :D sorry, I'm not arguing, i'm new in nodejs – karaxuna Apr 7 '12 at 22:31
1  
I would agree that syncIO is not the solution. A very simple solution would be to wrap the next step in a function and to invoke it at the end of the async callback. – Matt Esch Apr 7 '12 at 22:31
    
Matt can you show me an example please? – karaxuna Apr 7 '12 at 22:32
    
Sync I/O has its place — it's fine if you're doing a small build system or tool. On larger systems or server apps best practice is to avoid it. – RobW May 26 '14 at 3:11

There is actually a Synchronous function for this:

http://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_readfilesync_filename_encoding

Asynchronous

fs.readFile(filename, [encoding], [callback])

Asynchronously reads the entire contents of a file. Example:

fs.readFile('/etc/passwd', function (err, data) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log(data);
});

The callback is passed two arguments (err, data), where data is the contents of the file.

If no encoding is specified, then the raw buffer is returned.


SYNCHRONOUS

fs.readFileSync(filename, [encoding])

Synchronous version of fs.readFile. Returns the contents of the filename.

If encoding is specified then this function returns a string. Otherwise it returns a buffer.

var text = fs.readFileSync('test.md','utf8')
console.log (text)
share|improve this answer
    
Quick question, what is the use of the buffer that is being returned in synchronous version of readFile? If i read a file synchronously and do not pass any encoding, it prints buffer, how can i use this? Thank you. – noobcode Jul 21 '13 at 7:01
7  
I had experience with this recently. Let's say our buffer is data. if (Buffer.isBuffer( data){ result = data.toString('utf8'); } Now we have converted the buffer into readable text. This is good for reading a plaintext file or testing the file against format types. I could do a try/catch to see if it's a JSON file for example; but only after buffer is converted to text. Look here for more information: nodejs.org/api/buffer.html – Logan Jul 22 '13 at 0:49
    
Also as far as I know buffers are octet streams, and good for sending data "piece by piece." You must have seen that the buffer is something like AF 42 F1. Very practical for client-server-client communication. – Logan Jul 22 '13 at 0:52
function readContent(callback) {
    fs.readFile("./Index.html", function (err, content) {
        if (err) return callback(err)
        callback(null, content)
    })
}

readContent(function (err, content) {
    console.log(content)
})
share|improve this answer
2  
thanks very much, if i had 15 marks, i would vote up your answer :) – karaxuna Apr 7 '12 at 22:41
    
Hi, in the first line of your code, function readContent(callback), is callback a reserved word? I mean, is this the standard way to implement callbacks for your custom functions? I've just started learning node. – Amal Antony Jul 22 '13 at 8:26
2  
Hi Amal. Callback is simply the argument passed to his function, it could be event or c or any name you like - it is not a reserved word in Javascript, and I would assume the same extends to Node.js. – RealDeal_EE'18 Nov 25 '13 at 1:08
    
fs.readFile('index.html', callback) – royhowie Jun 24 '15 at 8:19
    
readContent(function (err, content) gives me a syntax error when using the function as a parameter. – monsto Nov 26 '15 at 17:16

As said, fs.readFile is an asynchronous action. that means that when you tell node to read a file, you need to consider that it will take some time and in the meantime, node continues to run the following code. in your case it's: console.log(content);.

It's like sending some part of node for a long trip (like reading a big file).

take a look at my comments:

var content;

// node, go fetch this file. when you come back, please run this "read" callback function
fs.readFile('./Index.html', function read(err, data) {
    if (err) {
        throw err;
    }
    content = data;
});

// in the meantime, please continue and run this console.log
console.log(content);

that's why content is still empty when you log it. node has not yet retrieved the file's content.

This could be resolved by moving console.log(content) inside the callback function, right after content = data;. this way you will see the log when node is done reading the file and after content gets a value.

share|improve this answer
var data = fs.readFileSync('tmp/reltioconfig.json','utf8');

use this for calling a file synchronously, without encoding its showing output as a buffer.

share|improve this answer
1  
You need a blank line before code blocks in order for the pretty printing to kick in. – royhowie Jun 24 '15 at 8:21

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