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Does anyone has experience with the rather new std::async? We are currently implementing a parallel file parser, which reads a file chunk and passes this chunk to an async function.

Using Clang (v3.0) this way works really fine with the default std::async policies (implementation dependent). On a two core machine, it fires up to 4 threads what works really well.

But with GCC (v4.7), the file reading thread does not spawn any new threads, making the program in the end completely sequential.

Using std::launch::async, both versions are pretty much doing the same (what should be the case).

Does anyone know the status of the current of GCC's c++11 threading capabilities? Or might this be an error in our implementation?

Short code:

while (readNewChunk()) {
    Chunk &chunk = fileReader_.getChunk(); //reading the file
    ChunkLoader *chunkLoader = new ChunkLoader();
    auto ftr = std::async(std::launch::async, &ChunkLoader::createDictionaries, chunkLoader);
    dictCreationFutures_.push_back(std::move(ftr));
}
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I would really recommend using Boost. It won't be a big jump to proper C++11 support. The new threading models in C++11 require a different memory layout than GCC or MSVC are using, and they aren't implemented much really. –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 7 '12 at 23:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The behavior is within spec, even if it's not what you desire. If you don't specify a launch policy, it is taken to be async|deferred, which means it is up to the implementation to decide which. GCC happens to always pick deferred if given a choice.

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Thanks for clearing that up. I thought all current implementations are a bit "more intelligent" and not just doing a plain deferred. –  Bouncner Apr 9 '12 at 15:20
2  
I beg to disagree. This is what the standard says (emphasis mine): "If this policy is specified together with other policies, such as when using a policy value of launch::async | launch::deferred, implementations should defer invocation or the selection of the policy when no more concurrency can be effectively exploited." This is vastly different from launching any new thread deferred. –  Yongwei Wu Apr 17 '13 at 9:14

EDIT2: I'll explain a bit more.

std::async promises a 'future;' that is: when you want it, it'll be there. It may be computed now, it may be computed when you ask for it, we're just promising it'll happen.

Like the poster below me notes, GCC defaults to deferred (which means, it'll fulfill that promise when it is asked for it, and probably not beforehand). The reason for this default is because GCC doesn't provide proper C++11 threading support yet. It doesn't have a good internal thread scheduler, among many other things. It is a bit of a hack. No, more like a bunch of a hack. In fact, if you write threaded code in C++11 on GCC, it's more so that when they DO implement features, it'll work right; right now, it mostly works right. I mean, you get the result in the end, right?

If you tell it to launch a thread, it will, because it's too stupid (at the moment) to realize that it can and should on its own (unlike CLang, which has a better internal thread scheduler currently).

EDIT: Seriously? Misinformed down-modding!

Here's my reference! http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/cxx0x.html . Note almost everything under 'concurrency' including 'memory model' is noted as NO . GCC.GNU.org. They are the authority on GCC you know.

Slightly edited from my comment:

I would really recommend using Boost. It won't be a big jump to proper C++11 support when GCC is ready. The new threading models in C++11 require a different memory layout than GCC or MSVC are using, and they aren't implemented much really yet.

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3  
What has changed in C++11 in terms of "memory layout"? –  Nicol Bolas Apr 8 '12 at 1:56
    
@NicolBolas gcc.gnu.org/projects/cxx0x.html . Note almost everything under 'concurrency' including 'memory model' is noted as NO –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 8 '12 at 13:55
5  
Yes, but that doesn't explain what changed with "memory layout". Layout is about where things go relative to other things. The memory model explains the rules about when accessed variables become visible in other threads and such. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 8 '12 at 17:09
    
@NicolBolas sigh, we C++ people are such pedants. –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 8 '12 at 19:10
2  
I up-voted. I think the GCC behaviour is plain wrong. See my comment under the other answer. –  Yongwei Wu Apr 17 '13 at 9:19

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