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I'm working on an application that uses nested arrays in Javascript. I have an array like this:

var a = ["Once upon a time there was a man."];

    a[1] = ["He was tall."];
           a[1][1] = ["He often bumped his head."];

    a[2] = ["He was short."];
           a[2][1] = ["He couldn't reach high shelves."]

Is there an easy way to figure out what level of an array a value is at? I'd like to be able to input "He often bumped his head" and have it return "a[1][1]" (or if I input "He was short" I'd get back "a[2]"). The arrays will be of indeterminate and fluctuating size.

Thanks in advance for any help with this. I'm new to javascript and jquery, so any explanation of your solution will be highly appreciated. Thanks again.

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Just for the record, you're not talking about a variable, you're talking about a value. A variable is something that can take on many values. A value is, well, some particular value. –  Pointy Apr 8 '12 at 0:49
    
You could use an object instead. Once arrays become so complex, objects are usually easier to work with. –  elclanrs Apr 8 '12 at 0:50
1  
@elclanrs Not necessarily. If you want to iterate over something and find it via an index, arrays are the only game in town. For...in loops are pretty fragile. Not only that, but certain functions that could be useful are only available to arrays. –  Greg Pettit Apr 8 '12 at 0:53
    
Well, it really depends. Using jQuery I usually prefer working with objects and mapping stuff to arrays with $.map(). That way you reduce and count things only when you need it and you still have your meaningful object with key value pairs... –  elclanrs Apr 8 '12 at 0:57

3 Answers 3

Some recursion should do the trick:

Array.prototype.recursiveIndexOf = function(item, start) {
    var i = this.indexOf(item);
    var r, c;

    start = start || [];

    if(i > -1) {
        return start.concat([i]);
    }

    for(i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        c = this[i];

        if(Object.prototype.toString.call(c) === '[object Array]') {
            r = c.recursiveIndexOf(item, start.concat(i));

            if(r !== null) {
                return r;
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
};

Here's a demo.

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For a two level array, you could do it like this:

function findMultiArray(array, str) {
    var innerArray;
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        innerArray = array[i];
        for (var j = 0; j < innerArray.length; j++) {
            if (innerArray[j] == str) {
                return([i, j]);
            }
        }
    } 
    return null;
}

Note, I had it just return an actual array with the two indexes since that's a little easier to use if you need the data in data form.

Unlike in your request, it will never return the equivalent of a[1] because a[1] is an array, not a string so the match is with a[1][0], not with a[1]. In that case, it would return [1,0].

If you want the return value in a different form, there's just one line of code where is sees the match and i and j are the indexes that matched.

If the level of arrays can be arbitrarily deep with different depths in different places, then that would be a little more involved and would require interrogating the type of items to see if they contained nested arrays or just strings and would require some sort of stack to maintain the current position. It would be easiest to do with recursion.

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Here is a much simpler answer. ;)

function array_search(ob,str)
{
    for(var i=0;i<ob.length;++i)
    {
        if(typeof(ob[i])=='object'&&(ob[i] instanceof Array))
        {
            var foo=array_search(ob[i],str);
            if(foo!=null)
                return i+'->'+foo;
        }else
        if(typeof(ob[i])=='string'&&ob[i]==str)
        {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

var a = ["Once upon a time there was a man."];
a[1] = ["He was tall."];
a[1][1] = ["He often bumped his head."];
a[2] = ["He was short."];
a[2][1] = ["He couldn't reach high shelves."]

alert(array_search(a,'He was short.'));
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