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I am trying to understand the JSDoc style for documenting JavaScript that is used with the JavaScript Closure Compiler. I have the JavaScript code below

// ==ClosureCompiler==
// @compilation_level ADVANCED_OPTIMIZATIONS
// ==/ClosureCompiler==

(function(){
    /**
     * @type Array.<string>
     * @private
     */
    var sb = [];

    /**
     * @const
     * @type{{append: function(string): SingltonStringBuffer, toString: function(): string}}
     */
    window['SingltonStringBuffer'] = {
        /**
         * @param {string} text
         * @return {SingltonStringBuffer}
         */
        append: function(text){
            sb.push(text);
            return SingltonStringBuffer;
        },
        /**
         * @return {string}
         */
        toString: function(){
            return sb.join("");
        }
    };
}());

When I do an advanced compile on this code I am receiving 2 warnings.

JSC_TYPE_PARSE_ERROR: Bad type annotation. Unknown type SingltonStringBuffer at line 10 character 35
* @type{{append: function(string): SingltonStringBuffer, toString: function()...
                                   ^ JSC_TYPE_PARSE_ERROR: Bad type annotation. Unknown type SingltonStringBuffer at line 15 character 11
* @return {SingltonStringBuffer}
           ^

The function append returns a deference to the encapsulating object. The variable that it is returning ,SingltonStringBuffer, is declared... so I am not sure what is wrong or how to correct it.

Any help that can be provided would be great.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You haven't created a named type as far as the compiler is concerned. For this case, I would expect you to create an interface:

/** @interface */
function StringBuffer() {
}
/**
 * @param {string} text
 * @return {StringBuffer}
 */
StringBuffer.prototype.append;

etc

This can be declared either in the code (if you are using advanced mode it will be stripped) or in your extern files (if you want the type without the code in simple mode).

You can then use it like so (in your case):

(function(){
/**
 * @type Array.<string>
 * @private
 */
var sb = [];

/**
 * @const
 * @type {StringBuffer}
 */
window['SingltonStringBuffer'] = {
    /**
     * @param {string} text
     * @return {StringBuffer}
     */
    append: function(text){
        sb.push(text);
        return SingltonStringBuffer;
    },
    /**
     * @return {string}
     */
    toString: function(){
        return sb.join("");
    }
};
}());
share|improve this answer
    
Can I create the interface and set the prototype inside my anonymous function? – Eric Apr 11 '12 at 2:56
    
Generally, you can't declare named types (such as an interface) within a function but I know there is some special handling for immediately called anonymous functions. However, if you are using ADVANCED mode the compiler is going to try to inline your anonymous function wrapper. If you want it preserved, you should using the compiler's output wrapper option to add it after compilation. You then declare all your types in "global" scope. This will result in tighter code. – John Apr 13 '12 at 17:01
    
Otherwise, you should consider using the externs. If you make this available to the consumers of the code they can use it for type checking as well. – John Apr 13 '12 at 17:04

singletons work differently in closure. I have not seen an explicit annotation for it, but the compiler (in advanced mode) has some understanding of certain built-in functions Singletons would be declared via the goog.addSingletonGetter function, here is a code sample

/**                                                                                 
 * @constructor                                                                     
 * @extends {path.to.BaseClass}                                                 
 */
path.to.MyClass = function() {
  goog.base(this);
};

goog.inherits(path.to.MyClass, path.to.BaseClass);
goog.addSingletonGetter(path.to.MyClass);

and that be it.

PS you are getting the bad annotation because {SingltonStringBuffer} is never declared as a class.

PPS. Some rambling on post the fact. I suspect (but this is untested) that making the constructer private might work. Notice the trailing underscore in the example

/**
 * @private -> NOTE THIS IS IN NO WAY VERIFIED                                                                                
 * @constructor                                                                     
 * @extends {path.to.BaseClass}                                                 
 */
path.to.MyClass_ = function() {
  goog.base(this);
};
goog.inherits(path.to.MyClass, path.to.BaseClass);
goog.addSingletonGetter(path.to.MyClass);
share|improve this answer
    
All well and good except that I don't have goog JS code available to me. – Eric Apr 9 '12 at 15:05
    
if you want to use the compiler in advanced mode then why don't you just use that function from the library, as it plays nice with the compiler. you only use what you compile in of the library, so you have no loss at some pretty awesome gain. – lennel Apr 10 '12 at 8:54

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