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I have some data like this, where the second field is the probability of the first field, so "0: 0.017" mean there is a 0.017 chance of 0. The sum of all probability is 1.

My question is: how do I "range line" from the probabilities so that I can find the lower bound and the upper bound of each character? so 0 would be [0, 0.017), [0.017, 0.022) and so on.

I am trying to implement the arithmetic encoding.

(0: 0.017,
1: 0.022,
2: 0.033,
3: 0.033,
4: 0.029,
5: 0.028,
6: 0.035,
7: 0.032,
8: 0.028,
9: 0.027,
a: 0.019,
b: 0.022,
c: 0.029,
d: 0.03,
e: 0.028,
f: 0.035,
g: 0.026,
h: 0.037,
i: 0.029,
j: 0.025,
k: 0.025,
l: 0.037,
m: 0.025,
n: 0.023,
o: 0.026,
p: 0.035,
q: 0.033,
r: 0.031,
s: 0.023,
t: 0.022,
u: 0.038,
v: 0.022,
w: 0.016,
x: 0.026,
y: 0.021,
z: 0.033,)

edit*

nvm i figured it out, just messing up on the silly math... thanks for all the inputs!!!

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 9 '12 at 14:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Is your data in a text file? Or this is some kind of data structure? –  George Apr 8 '12 at 1:19
    
@George need a data structure, i get the probabilities from a textfile of random chars/numbers –  Joe Chen Apr 8 '12 at 1:25
3  
"0 would be [0, 0.017), [0.017, 0.022)" - Don't you mean "0 would be [0, 0.017), 1 would be [0.017, 0.017+0.022), 2 would be [0.017+0.022, 0.017+0.022+0.033)" –  ninjagecko Apr 8 '12 at 1:28
1  
Wouldn't you have to order the characters by relative frequency before you tried to describe cumulative probability? –  Joel Cornett Apr 8 '12 at 1:31
    
@George yes, i just followed that method. –  Joe Chen Apr 8 '12 at 2:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
# The data is input as '1: 0.022,' format
def process_data(line):
    # for returning the new string that is cleaned up
    result_line = ''
    for character in line:
        # check if it is either a number or a letter
        if character.isdigit() or character.isalpha():
            result_line += character
        # we want the decimal point
        elif character == '.':
            result_line += character
        # else we replace it with space ' '
        else:
            result_line += ' '
    return result_line

my_list = []  

with open('input.txt') as file:
    for lines in file:
        processed_line = process_data(lines)
        # temp_list has ['letter', 'frequency']
        temp_list = (processed_line.split())
        value = temp_list[0]
        # Require to cast it to a float, since it is a string
        frequency = float(temp_list[1])
        my_list.append([value, frequency])

print(my_list)        

From this point on you can figure out what to do with your values. I documented the code (granted a really simple naive way to process the input file). But the my_list is now clean and nicely formatted, with string (value), and float (frequency). Hope this help.

Output of the code from above:

[['0', 0.017], ['1', 0.022], ['2', 0.033], ['3', 0.033], 
['4', 0.029], ['5', 0.028], ['6', 0.035], ['7', 0.032], 
['8', 0.028], ['9', 0.027], ['a', 0.019], ['b', 0.022], 
['c', 0.029], ['d', 0.03], ['e', 0.028], ['f', 0.035], 
['g', 0.026], ['h', 0.037], ['i', 0.029], ['j', 0.025], 
['k', 0.025], ['l', 0.037], ['m', 0.025], ['n', 0.023], 
['o', 0.026], ['p', 0.035], ['q', 0.033], ['r', 0.031], 
['s', 0.023], ['t', 0.022], ['u', 0.038], ['v', 0.022], 
['w', 0.016], ['x', 0.026], ['y', 0.021], ['z', 0.033]]

And then...

# Took a page out of TokenMacGuy, credit to him
distribution = []
distribution.append(0.00)  
total = 0.0 # Create a float here

for entry in my_list:
    distribution.append(entry[1])
    total += frequency
    total = round(total, 3) # Rounding to 2 decimal points

distribution.append(1.00) # Missing the 1.00 value
print(distribution) # Print to check

Output of is here:

[0.0, 0.017, 0.022, 0.033, 0.033, 0.029, 0.028, 0.035, 0.032, 
0.028, 0.027, 0.019, 0.022, 0.029, 0.03, 0.028, 0.035, 0.026, 
0.037, 0.029, 0.025, 0.025, 0.037, 0.025, 0.023, 0.026, 0.035, 
0.033, 0.031, 0.023, 0.022, 0.038, 0.022, 0.016, 0.026, 0.021, 
0.033, 1.0]

And finally, to output the final result: There isn't anything too special, I used the pattern and format to let them look nicer. And it is pretty much according to ninjagecko's method to calculate it. I did have to pad the 0.00, and 1.00 into the distribution, since the calculation did not show it. Pretty straight forward implementation after we figure out how to do the probability.

pattern = '{0}: [{1:1.3f}, {2:1.3f})'
count = 1 # a counter to keep track of the index

pre_p = distribution[0] 
p = distribution[1]

# Here we will print it out at the end in the format you said in the question
for entry in my_list:
    print(pattern.format(entry[0], pre_p, p))
    pre_p += distribution[count]
    p += distribution[count+1]
    count = count + 1

Output:

0: [0.000, 0.017)
1: [0.017, 0.039)
2: [0.039, 0.072)
3: [0.072, 0.105)
4: [0.105, 0.134)
5: [0.134, 0.162)
6: [0.162, 0.197)
7: [0.197, 0.229)
8: [0.229, 0.257)
9: [0.257, 0.284)
a: [0.284, 0.303)
b: [0.303, 0.325)
c: [0.325, 0.354)
d: [0.354, 0.384)
e: [0.384, 0.412)
f: [0.412, 0.447)
g: [0.447, 0.473)
h: [0.473, 0.510)
i: [0.510, 0.539)
j: [0.539, 0.564)
k: [0.564, 0.589)
l: [0.589, 0.626)
m: [0.626, 0.651)
n: [0.651, 0.674)
o: [0.674, 0.700)
p: [0.700, 0.735)
q: [0.735, 0.768)
r: [0.768, 0.799)
s: [0.799, 0.822)
t: [0.822, 0.844)
u: [0.844, 0.882)
v: [0.882, 0.904)
w: [0.904, 0.920)
x: [0.920, 0.946)
y: [0.946, 0.967)
z: [0.967, 1.000)

Full source is here: http://codepad.org/a6YkHhed

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Converting your data to python is left as an exercise:

>>> corpus = [('0', 0.017), ('1', 0.022), ('2', 0.033), ('3', 0.033), ('4', 0.029),
...           ('5', 0.028), ('6', 0.035), ('7', 0.032), ('8', 0.028), ('9', 0.027),
...           ('a', 0.019), ('b', 0.022), ('c', 0.029), ('d', 0.030), ('e', 0.028),
...           ('f', 0.035), ('g', 0.026), ('h', 0.037), ('i', 0.029), ('j', 0.025),
...           ('k', 0.025), ('l', 0.037), ('m', 0.025), ('n', 0.023), ('o', 0.026),
...           ('p', 0.035), ('q', 0.033), ('r', 0.031), ('s', 0.023), ('t', 0.022),
...           ('u', 0.038), ('v', 0.022), ('w', 0.016), ('x', 0.026), ('y', 0.021),
...           ('z', 0.033)]

create a cumulative sum:

>>> distribution = []
>>> total = 0.0
>>> for letter, frequency in corpus:
...     distribution.append(total)
...     total += frequency
... 

Actually using that sort of data is the bread and butter of the bisect module.

>>> import bisect, random
>>> def random_letter():
...     value = random.random()
...     index = bisect.bisect(distribution, value) - 1
...     return corpus[index][0]
... 
>>> [random_letter() for n in range(10)]  # doctest: +SKIP
['d', '6', 'p', 'c', '8', 'f', '7', 'm', 'z', '7']
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Create dictionary, with keys being your characters, values being a pair defining lower and upper bound.

prev_p = 0
bounds = {}
for line in open(a_file):
   character, p = parse_the_line(line)
   bounds[character] = (prev_p, p)
   prev_p = p
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