Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to organize all of my GameObjects into a hierarchy structure. I would assume that a tree would be the best idea for this. I have thought about using STD::Set to handle this. Does that make any sense? Basically, a GameObject can hold a variable number of other GameObjects. If I do handle it in this way, then what is the best way to handle accessing an object in the tree? Would accessing them via ID be fast enough? I suppose I could also just access them via pointers, but passing those around sounds somewhat dangerous and tedious if you get to a situation with a lot of Objects.

I will also be displaying this data if that has any impact.

EX:

-Hierarchy
    -GameObject
        -GameObject
        -Gameobject
    -GameObject
        -GameObject
            -GameObject
   -GameObject

I appreciate any input guys. Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
What makes you think that std::set is suited for holding trees? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 8 '12 at 1:25
    
If you are not good with pointers, even 1 is dangerous. If you are good with them, 1 and 100 don't make a difference. This sentence I could also just access them via pointers, but passing those around sounds somewhat dangerous and tedious if you get to a situation with a lot of Objects doesn't make sense! – Shahbaz Apr 8 '12 at 1:53

I'm assuming you want to do something like this:

class GameObject {
    some_container<GameObject> nested_objects_;
    ....
}

If you don't really need O(log(n)) search and remove in your collection of objects, I would suggest using std::vector instead, so you'll avoid memory overhead, and (very likely) some CPU overhead too. So if you only need to store a few nested objects per each object, then definitely choose std::vector

But if you need to find/remove objects fast or maintain uniqueness, then std::set may be a good choice. In order to use std::set you need to provide a comparison function, which acts like a < operator(strictly speaking, your comparison function must be strict weak ordering.) You may just define operator < for you GameObject class. The efficiency of std::set depends on this function, so be careful here.

Note, that you either traverse, the whole set, or find individual GameObjects by providing the GameObject itself(strictly speaking, you may provide its equivalent - look into comparison function). So if you need to get objects by its id, better use std::map, it is much more suited for this type of job. std::set reference. std::map reference

I also suggest to look into boost::unordered_set & boost::unordered_map(or std::unordered_set & std::unordered_map if you can use C++11).

share|improve this answer

Is there a reason you each "game object" can't have an array of game objects as an instance variable? Perhaps your main should create an array of GameObjects, and each of those games objects could hold proceeding game objects in an array instance variable. That's how I would think about it at least.

share|improve this answer

I have thought about using STD::Set to handle this. Does that make any sense?

No. std::set is made for storing collection of unique objects, where objects are ordered using either operator< or lessthan comparator provided by user. There's no reason to use std::set for object list.

Would accessing them via ID be fast enough?

Here's the catch. There are no IDs in std::set. There are objects. So if you use std::set, you won't be able to access object by ID without iterating through the whole set (unless objects are ordered by ID, but that's another story). To map something to something else you use std::map. std::set is for collections.

If I do handle it in this way, then what is the best way to handle accessing an object in the tree?

The best way would be probably to use lists or deques - depending on the way your game is going to handle objects.

There's no "the best" way for representing trees.

  1. You could store root objects of hierarchy in a list AND store children within parent objects.
  2. You could store all objects within list (both children and parents), for child objects store reference to parent then make sure that "update()" function takes that into account.
  3. You could store two lists - one for root objects and another one for all objects. (for example, you call update on 1st list, and use second list for collision detection queries and such)

All those approaches make sense and can be useful for certain scenarios.

but passing those around sounds somewhat dangerous

Yep, that's a sure way to crash a game when somebody who fired a missile has been blown to smithereens and missile has pointer to owner for friendly-fire check. However, since your question is tagged "boost", you can use boost::weak_ptr to deal with this problem. Also objects could be stored as a list of shared_ptr's within std::list, std::deque or even std::vector - depending on how your game is going to use them.

share|improve this answer
    
As an alternative, you can have entities post a message to any listeners saying that they are being destroyed - in this case, if the person who fired the missile gets killed then the missile gets alerted to that by the messaging system. – Stuart Golodetz Apr 8 '12 at 2:11
    
@StuartGolodetz: Yep, there are several ways to do it. However I think it is better idea to use a solution that deals with situation automatically and doesn't require you to write anything. Unless messaging mechanism is provided by existing library (and "about to be destroyed" notification is done automatically), I think it'll be better to use something like weak_ptr. Example of such notifications is QObject::destroyed() signal, but it depends on application - making everything QObject will be certainly an overkill for many apps. – SigTerm Apr 8 '12 at 2:46

For what it's worth, I find accessing them by "path", a bit like a directory tree on disk, works quite well. This is taken from some C# code I'm writing (note that I've missed bits out of the class below), but the idea will translate straightforwardly to C++:

sealed class Entity : IEntity
{
    private readonly IDictionary<string,IEntity> m_children = new Dictionary<string,IEntity>();

    private readonly IDictionary<string,dynamic> m_properties;

    public string Name { get { return m_properties["Name"]; } }

    public IEntity Parent { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds a child to this entity.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="child">The child to add.</param>
    public void AddChild(IEntity child)
    {
        m_children.Add(child.Name, child);
        child.Parent = this;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the absolute path of this entity in its tree.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The entity's absolute path.</returns>
    public string GetAbsolutePath()
    {
        IEntity cur = this;
        var path = new LinkedList<string>();
        while(cur.Parent != null)
        {
            path.AddFirst(cur.Name);
            cur = cur.Parent;
        }
        path.AddFirst(".");
        return string.Join("/", path);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets another entity in this entity's tree by its absolute path (i.e. its path relative to the root entity).
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path">The absolute path to the other entity.</param>
    /// <returns>The other entity, if found, or null otherwise.</returns>
    public IEntity GetEntityByAbsolutePath(string path)
    {
        return GetRootEntity().GetEntityByRelativePath(path);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets another entity in this entity's tree by its absolute path (i.e. its path relative to the root entity).
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path">The absolute path to the other entity, as a list of path components.</param>
    /// <returns>The other entity, if found, or null otherwise.</returns>
    public IEntity GetEntityByAbsolutePath(LinkedList<string> path)
    {
        return GetRootEntity().GetEntityByRelativePath(path);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets another entity in this entity's tree by its path relative to this entity.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path">The relative path to the other entity.</param>
    /// <returns>The other entity, if found, or null otherwise.</returns>
    public IEntity GetEntityByRelativePath(string path)
    {
        return GetEntityByRelativePath(new LinkedList<string>(path.Split('/')));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets another entity in this entity's tree by its path relative to this entity.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path">The relative path to the other entity, as a list of path components.</param>
    /// <returns>The other entity, if found, or null otherwise.</returns>
    public IEntity GetEntityByRelativePath(LinkedList<string> path)
    {
        IEntity cur = this;

        while(cur != null && path.Count != 0)
        {
            switch(path.First())
            {
                case ".":
                    break;
                case "..":
                    cur = cur.Parent;
                    break;
                default:
                    cur = cur.GetChild(path.First());
                    break;
            }

            path.RemoveFirst();
        }

        return cur;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the root entity of this entity's tree.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The root entity of this entity's tree.</returns>
    private IEntity GetRootEntity()
    {
        IEntity cur = this;
        while(cur.Parent != null)
        {
            cur = cur.Parent;
        }
        return cur;
    }
}

Given any entity in the entity tree, you can then access other entities by their absolute or relative path, e.g.

cityA.GetEntityByRelativePath("../city:B/building:1");
share|improve this answer
    
By that logic in 3d shooter you'll have to provide unique name for every enemy and even for every projectile. Sounds like a case of "YAGNI" for me. – SigTerm Apr 8 '12 at 2:05
    
@SigTerm: It's for a city-building game, seems to work reasonably well in context. I agree that for a FPS with a much larger number of entities it might get a bit silly :) Incidentally, providing unique names is not very difficult when you can use GUIDs. – Stuart Golodetz Apr 8 '12 at 2:09
    
@SigTerm: "seems to work reasonably" It'll work reasonably as long as your game doesn't include godzilla attacks and similar city-destrying cataclysms. If portions of city get destroyed and regenerated frequently or if city frequently changes, (IMO) you'll most likely have to deal with possible name collisions, which might be messy. On other hand, you'll get street address for everything, which might be useful for your game. – SigTerm Apr 8 '12 at 2:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.